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Baseball - Discussion (any team/any year)

muggle

New Member
For SFG75 and sofia........the 1986 N.Y. Mets starting lineup. Can you name the 4th starting pitcher.

C Gary Carter
1B *Keith Hernandez
2B #Wally Backman
3B Ray Knight
SS Rafael Santana
OF *Lenny Dykstra
OF *Darryl Strawberry
OF #Mookie Wilson

P - Dwight Gooden
P - Bob Ojeda
P - Sid Fernandez
 

muggle

New Member
curiouswonder said:
I'm not SFG or Sofia, but I think it was Ron Darling. That was a big time team.
Curiouswonder, I only mentioned SFG and sofia because they were the ones that brought up the 1986 Mets team on the other topic. Please participate in the Baseball discussion as I/we enjoy your posts. And yes, Ron Darling was one of the other two starters. The other starter was Rick Aguilera. Of course, Davey Johnson was the manager.

Another question? Who did the mets play in the world series that year.
 

SFG75

Well-Known Member
That would be the Boston Red Sox and they lost due to the brilliance of first baseman Bill "Bonehead" Buckner. Speaking of, I have a Topps baseball card of that guy. I don't know whether to keep it or burn it, I'm still afraid of it to this day.


aimages.art.com_images_products_large_10105000_10105650.jpg


>The ball went between bonehead's legs. That's him chasing it and Mookie Wilson heading to first.
 

SFG75

Well-Known Member
My turn........

Of the guys listed on the starting roster, who is mentioned or appears in a cameo in more than a couple episodes of Seinfeld?
 

muggle

New Member
Sofia said:
keith hernandez:D repeats are always on
SFG, is sofia's answer correct??

If so, I have a question. What former great, great, Met player was on the Red Sox team in 1986.
 

SFG75

Well-Known Member
muggle said:
SFG, is sofia's answer correct??

If so, I have a question. What former great, great, Met player was on the Red Sox team in 1986.


Yep-she's correct. For some reason, I remember an episode where George mentions Keith Hernandez in a locker room and Keith runs into them and starts talking to Seinfeld like they were personal friends. Hilarious episode.

Ahhhhh, that would've been Tom Seaver after he was a Padre.
 

muggle

New Member
That would be "Oil Can Boyd" who played for the Boston Red sox most of his career. mehastings should have answered that question.

Which team had "no hands".
 

muggle

New Member
That would be "Oil Can Boyd" who played for the Boston Red sox most of his career. mehastings should have answered that question.

Which team had "no hands".
 

mehastings

Active Member
SFG75 said:
That would be the Boston Red Sox and they lost due to the brilliance of first baseman Bill "Bonehead" Buckner. Speaking of, I have a Topps baseball card of that guy. I don't know whether to keep it or burn it, I'm still afraid of it to this day.

Keep it. Buckner was a great player, and the Sox wouldn't have made it to the series that year without him. Blaming Buckner for the '86 loss (as 90% of baseball fans do) is blatant scapegoating. What people seem to forget is that Buckner 1) was playing injured after McNamara refused to replace him late in the game (even though he had done so all season long) and 2) wouldn't have beaten Wilson to first base even if he had gotten the ball because Wilson was so damn fast. Everyone seems to have forgotten that lousy pitching decisions had gotten the Sox into that position in the first place AND there was a game seven, which the Sox failed to win. Thus, Buckner should not be blamed for losing the Series. Ultimately, if you want to blame someone, I'm going with McNamara who can only be beaten by Grady Little in the "Who makes the worst decisions at crunch time?" contest.

OK...rant over. I'd just like to point out that the Sox are currently winning their division and the Yankees are well...where they belong.
 

mehastings

Active Member
muggle said:
That would be "Oil Can Boyd" who played for the Boston Red sox most of his career. mehastings should have answered that question.

Which team had "no hands".

Don't worry. I would have if I had seen it. I'll answer yours though. The Pittsburgh Pirates had Hall of Famer Bill Mazeroski, one of the best second basemen in history. He turned so fast on the pivot that it looked like he had never even touched the ball. I should get bonus points for this one since he retired seven and a half years before I was born.

Babe Ruth was one of five players selected for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1936 (the first year inductions were made). He was not, however, the player to receive the most votes that year. Who was?
 

muggle

New Member
There is a very good book by David Halberstam called "The Teammates". It is about 4 of the great Red Sox players and their lifelong friendship. Bobby Doerr, Johnny Pesky, Dom DiMaggio, and Ted Williams. I really enjoyed the book, and I am NOT a Red Sox fan. I am a Pirate fan of many years.

The year they won the American League pennant in 1946 they had a nice lineup:

C - Hal Wagner
1B - Rudy York
2B - Bobby Doerr
3B - Rip Russell
SS - Johnny Pesky
OF - Ted Williams
OF - Dom DiMaggio
OF - Catfish Metkovich

They also had a pitcher that won 25 games that year. Who was it?
 

curiouswonder

New Member
muggle said:
There is a very good book by David Halberstam called "The Teammates". It is about 4 of the great Red Sox players and their lifelong friendship. Bobby Doerr, Johnny Pesky, Dom DiMaggio, and Ted Williams. I really enjoyed the book, and I am NOT a Red Sox fan. I am a Pirate fan of many years.
My wife bought that book for me last year. It was good stuff. I love looking back on the earlier eras in baseball. they weren't perfect days, but in so many ways they were better than the goofiness (coughbondscough) that goes on today. As a Cubs fan, I have to enjoy the past. 1908 was a long time ago.
 

muggle

New Member
mehastings said:
Don't worry. I would have if I had seen it. I'll answer yours though. The Pittsburgh Pirates had Hall of Famer Bill Mazeroski, one of the best second basemen in history. He turned so fast on the pivot that it looked like he had never even touched the ball. I should get bonus points for this one since he retired seven and a half years before I was born.

Babe Ruth was one of five players selected for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1936 (the first year inductions were made). He was not, however, the player to receive the most votes that year. Who was?
Somehow I missed your post mehastings. You are correct on Bill Mazerowski. It was worth the price of admission to just watch Maz in infield practice, and I watched him many times. He really was fun to watch, what a smooth fielder. I sure miss the teams and players from those years. I will give you a few bonus points......but you still did not win the NCAA pickems.:)

curiouswonder said:
My wife bought that book for me last year. It was good stuff. I love looking back on the earlier eras in baseball. they weren't perfect days, but in so many ways they were better than the goofiness (coughbondscough) that goes on today. As a Cubs fan, I have to enjoy the past. 1908 was a long time ago.
I really enjoyed the book. They were 4 great guys.

Wow, a Cubbie fan. You surely do have my sympathy.:) remember the days of Ernie Banks or Alvin Dark?
 

curiouswonder

New Member
muggle said:
Wow, a Cubbie fan. You surely do have my sympathy.:) remember the days of Ernie Banks or Alvin Dark?
I'm a little young to have seen those guys, but Ernie Banks is one of my favorite Cubs. I'm more from the Ryne Sandberg / Greg Maddux (the first time around) / Rick Sutcliffe era.
As for sympathy, I like to think of loving the Cubs as the best way to enjoy baseball. All of the joy of the game with none of the pressure to win. :rolleyes:
 
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