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Do You Remember What You Read?

direstraits

Well-Known Member
Still a crime. Will probably murder you a little slower, just to register my appreciation on another sale.

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eclair

Member
Fiction is easy, you can remember it piecemeal with a reliance on impression and emotion. The same way we can recall a funny story someone once told or that sexy commuter we made eyes at on the train long ago. All the details are pertinent.

Non-Fiction, I find harder. My memory usually condenses the book down to a handful of facts or new things the author may have offered up.
 

direstraits

Well-Known Member
Fiction is easy, you can remember it piecemeal with a reliance on impression and emotion. The same way we can recall a funny story someone once told or that sexy commuter we made eyes at on the train long ago. All the details are pertinent.

Non-Fiction, I find harder. My memory usually condenses the book down to a handful of facts or new things the author may have offered up.
I agree. Fiction is much easier, although I dislike losing details. It's really the non-fiction that I'm really bothered about. Reading all the facts and then forgetting them seems to be an turns rewarding learning into an unacceptable waste of time.

But then I already know I'm slightly weird in this regard. :)
 

Meadow337

Former Moderator
no not really I just don't bother tooooo much with what doesn't get retained. If a fact is interesting it sticks. And if it doesn't I remember (more or less) where to look it up (This is why we have books and google :) )
 

eclair

Member
^ I worry (in the manner of a paranoid Luddite) that the ease of external databases is corroding my brain.
 

Meadow337

Former Moderator
oh dear :) actually its had the opposite effect on me. The amount of information on an infinite range of subjects limited only by the extent of my curiousity has considerably expanded my already overly large collection of odd facts.
 

direstraits

Well-Known Member
Hmm, maybe we should have an online quiz or something. You know, to make use of these 'useless' facts. :) I always love quizzes. :)
 

Ell

Well-Known Member
It's not so bad though. I don't aim to be on Jeopardy, so why would I need to remember the books? I assume if there's great thoughts in the book I'll remember some of that, not as how it was written but how I understood it and I'll come out a wiser person for having read it. I enjoy the books as I read them and the thoughts they might or might not spawn, after that they've served their purpose.
Hello hay! Long time no see ...

Keeping track of books helps me avoid re-buying books I've already read as well as satisfy my OCD tendencies :)


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Ell

Well-Known Member
Hello Ell, good to see you around. I always read that as long time nosy.
Ha! Well I'm that too. :)

direstraits said:
Hmm, maybe we should have an online quiz or something. You know, to make use of these 'useless' facts. :) I always love quizzes. :)

No such thing as useless facts. I've won many a Jeopardy game with all the trivia floating around in my brain pan. :0
 

eclair

Member
^ Not sure how to google-proof a quiz. We could rely on an honour system, but then I have no honour.
 
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