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Does the Blurb on the Book Ever Match it's contents?

Meadow337

Former Moderator
Pursuant to Peder's comments in the November BOTM discussion regards blurbs vs content it got me thinking - does the blurb ever match the content?

And further, if you remove names and titles from the blurb could you identify the book?

* is a * who enjoys a comfortable, unambitious life, rarely traveling any farther than his pantry or cellar. But his contentment is disturbed when * and * arrive on his doorstep one day to whisk him away on an adventure. They have launched a plot to raid the treasure hoard guarded by *, a large and very dangerous *. * reluctantly joins their quest, unaware that on his journey to * he will encounter both a magic ring and a frightening creature known as*.
Can you identify it and does it describe the book?
 

Peder

Well-Known Member
Good morning, and thanks for the mention.

Yes, I can identify the book. The name is right on the tip of my tongue. It is * . . . .* But it will come to me. :D

Ah! The Hobbit ?

But that blurb leaves out one almost universal final phrase: ". . . before the world comes to an end." :eek
 

Meadow337

Former Moderator
:rofl just goes to show!

How about another one?


*’s classic tale of the pleasures of country life and the dependability of good friends will never grow old. Now, in this splendid volume, Inga Moore recaptures its scenes and its characters with richly patterned and warmly detailed illustrations. Here, drawn with charming freshness, are impulsive dear *, rash Mr. *, reclusive *, and sensible *, so happy just "messing around in boats." And here are the most treasured moments from * - *’s first enraptured row on the river, *'s irrepressible adventures in and out of automobiles, and many more. So gather ’round to read or listen, and, as * and * would heartily agree, a fine time will be had by all.​
 

Richard Hannay

New Member
That's The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame, right? Ratty and Mole "messing about in boats"?

How about:
"One of the most celebrated and popular historical romances ever written, * tells the story of the early adventures of the young Gascon gentleman * and his three friends from the regiments of the King's Musketeers- *, * and *. Under the watchful eye of their patron *, the four defend the honour of the regiment against the guards of *, and the honour of the queen against the machinations of * himself as the power struggles of seventeenth-century France are vividly played out in the background. But their most dangerous encounter is with *'s spy, *, one of literature's most memorable female villains, and * employs all of his fast-paced narrative skills to bring this enthralling novel to a breathtakingly gripping and dramatic conclusion.
 
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Meadow337

Former Moderator
That's The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame, right? Ratty and Mole "messing about in boats"?

How about:
"One of the most celebrated and popular historical romances ever written, * tells the story of the early adventures of the young Gascon gentleman * and his three friends from the regiments of the King's Musketeers- *, * and *. Under the watchful eye of their patron *, the four defend the honour of the regiment against the guards of *, and the honour of the queen against the machinations of * himself as the power struggles of seventeenth-century France are vividly played out in the background. But their most dangerous encounter is with *'s spy, *, one of literature's most memorable female villains, and * employs all of his fast-paced narrative skills to bring this enthralling novel to a breathtakingly gripping and dramatic conclusion.

Yes it is Wind in the Willows and yours is ... The Three Musketeers - Alexandre Dumas (should have taken out the bit about 'King's Musketeers :) )

They are an unlikely pair: * is "small and quick and dark of face"; *, a man of tremendous size, has the mind of a young child. Yet they have formed a "family," clinging together in the face of loneliness and alienation.

Laborers in *'s dusty vegetable fields, they hustle work when they can, living a hand-to-mouth existence. For * and * have a plan: to own an acre of land and a shack they can call their own. When they land jobs on a ranch in the *, the fulfillment of their dream seems to be within their grasp. But even * cannot guard * from the provocations of a flirtatious woman, nor predict the consequences of *'s unswerving obedience to the things *taught him.

"A thriller, a gripping tale . . . that you will not set down until it is finished. * has touched the quick." —The New York Times​
 

hay82

Active Member
I'll have a look at one of the books on the shelf when I get back and see what might be interesting to try this with.
 

Meadow337

Former Moderator
I'll have a look at one of the books on the shelf when I get back and see what might be interesting to try this with.

cool ... in the meantime ...

(because this is actually kind of fun)

Deep inside the dreaded *, a young prisoner has languished, his face hidden from all, for eight long years. He knows neither his true identity nor the crime that got him there. Then *, one of the original * — the finest swordsmen in all of * — bribes his way into the young man’s cell to reveal the shocking truth. The revelation of this truth could very well topple *, from his throne—and * aims to do just that.

But a daring jailbreak, a brilliant masquerade, and a bloody fight for the throne may make * betray his sacred vow of “*.” And in so doing, he will pit * against *, bringing an end to this swashbuckling saga—and either honor or disgrace upon them all.…
 

Meadow337

Former Moderator
Is it the iron mask?
The Man in the Iron Mask - yes

As ferociously fresh as it was more than a half century ago, this remarkable allegory of a downtrodden society of overworked, and mistreated and their quest to create a paradise of progress, justice, and equality is one of the most scathing satires ever published. As readers witness the rise and bloody fall of the revolution, they begin to recognize the seeds of totalitarianism in the most idealistic organization—and in the most charismatic leaders, the souls of the cruelest oppressors.
 

Sparhawk

Active Member
The Man in the Iron Mask - yes

As ferociously fresh as it was more than a half century ago, this remarkable allegory of a downtrodden society of overworked, and mistreated and their quest to create a paradise of progress, justice, and equality is one of the most scathing satires ever published. As readers witness the rise and bloody fall of the revolution, they begin to recognize the seeds of totalitarianism in the most idealistic organization—and in the most charismatic leaders, the souls of the cruelest oppressors.

Sounds like I should give this book a try :)
 

Meadow337

Former Moderator
Care to try to get the next one?

Clearly LOL the blurbs, at least for the well known classics, do in fact identify the book.
 
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