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October 2013: Adolfo Bioy Casares: The Invention of Morel

Discussion in 'Book of the Month' started by Polly Parrot, Sep 16, 2013.

  1. Polly Parrot

    Polly Parrot Moderator Staff Member

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    Currently Reading:
    F. Scott Fitzgerald, Short Stories
    Yes, I am aware this one wasn't one of the suggestions for October. However, because there were so little votes and not a whole lot of time left I thought I'd pick this one as it's a short story so there should be enough time to read it before discussion starts. :)
     
  2. Meadow337

    Meadow337 Former Moderator

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    Has any one read this? Comments? Thoughts? Opinions?
     
  3. Conscious Bob

    Conscious Bob Well-Known Member

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    Currently Reading:
    Barry Lyndon by William Thackeray
    It could be be the best ever book I've never read.
     
  4. Meadow337

    Meadow337 Former Moderator

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    Clearly wasn't popular as we are now in November.
     
  5. Spiritchaser

    Spiritchaser New Member

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    I believe that in order to fully appreciate this enigmatic piece of work one ought to watch Alain Resnais' film Last Year at Marienbad which drew on its ideas - mainly on time and memory a la Borges. I see it as a mirror which is held up onto reality, or a virtual reality (almost science fiction) which runs parallel to film and tv-reality; a sort of vicarious experience that highlights the reader's/viewer's perception of fiction. It carefully sets up and then later on deliberately blurs the black-and-white distinction (mimicking the silent films of the 20s that the author was so fond of) of the real world and the perceived world.
     
  6. deOmair

    deOmair New Member

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    Yes, I am aware this would be great
     

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