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J. K. Rowling: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows **CONTAINS SPOILERS**

Scout11

New Member
I really liked it. There were some things JK could have included in the epilogue. (I do wish she had told us what they ended up doing for careers, and what happened to Luna) However, I was not disappointed. Now I am just sad it'e over.
 

crjuniper

New Member
I feel that the ending is anything but cliche. J.K. Rowling spent an enormous amount of time I am sure thinking up the ending involving Dumbledore and Snape. The book started making Snape and Dumbledore look like treacherous fools that neither cared about Harry as a person or as much more than someone that could offer up his life for the benefit of others. But the turn around at the end of the book not only astonished me, but made me feel better because I always liked Snape and felt that there was more to him than just Dumbledore's assassin.
 

Rien

New Member
I liked Peeves' song. Somehow it made me feel all nostalgic (I'm sentimental; can't help it!) and giggly at the same time.

And I agree about the idea of Neville whacking Bellatrix; Molly could have had her little "protective mother" scene with some other death eater, and Neville could have had his vengeful closure. At least someone's storyline could have been tied up and ended. It seemed that no-one else's really was, other than the three main characters. Still, after reading HBP, it was better than I'd dared to hope for from her.
 

bren

Member
I was very happy to see Molly Weasley take out LeStrange. Ambivalent about her cry as she attacked since it seemed a little lurid. Neville was much too important a character to do anything less than hack out the final horcrux.

I hated the epilogue. I infinitely prefer being left to my imagination. On the other hand I can see that the ends weren't sufficiently tied up, nor the book carefully enough revised to call it finished, as is, so what the heck. What I really disliked was that since all the children were named after the sainted dead, every time they opened their mouths I could only picture these little miniature goblin versions of the original characters, with pinched in little voices. Um, I guess that's actually kind of funny.

Otherwise satisfied, though. I've always liked them, every one.
 

Zenn

New Member
And it's all over :(

Enjoyed the book but the usual complains like everybody here (lousy Harry-Voldemort showdown, abit of a cliche ending) From the first few chapters, I really thought Harry was going to die, the way Rowling wrote it. Snape is the unsung hero of the series, never trusted fully and doubted by both good and evil, he proved his worth right at the very end.

Some points that I did not get:

- I don't get the fact about Harry having his mum's eyes being important. What did I miss?
- There was something Rowling said about someone who would surprisingly do magic in the book right?
- And Fawkes just disappeared?
 

crjuniper

New Member
Zenn I think I can help you with Harry's eyes. Snape was in love with Lily, and when Snape was dying his last words to Harry were, "look into my eyes". I think Snape wanted what was as close to seeing Lily as possible, and that was looking into Harry's eyes.
 

Catalyst

New Member
As with the end of any set of books it was sad to come to the end of The Deathly Hallows. My favourite is still Goblet of Fire. The mushy ending was needed in my opinion as HP went through enough crap to deserve it! There is never a good way to end a set of books Like HP. There will always be loose ends. I cried when Dobby died....And geez 5 kids! Harry and Ginny got busy didnt they!
 

-Carlos-

New Member
I hate to be the glass is half empty guy but I must say, never read the books, that Harry Potter books are childlike novels. They do not cater to adults so my interest is dim.

This thread must be wonderful for young readers though. For me, I can do without it. :(
 

Catalyst

New Member
I hate to be the glass is half empty guy but I must say, never read the books, that Harry Potter books are childlike novels. They do not cater to adults so my interest is dim.

This thread must be wonderful for young readers though. For me, I can do without it. :(

:confused: Im 23.....my sister is 28 and she loves them......get a grip and open your mind! If you really cant use your imagination then leave the posting on a HP thread to people who actually like them!
 

-Carlos-

New Member
I am only expressing my view. Don't take it personally. It's just that when a news team film a story on these books you ALWAYS see KIDS in the background (with costumes) cheering for Harry Potter. You NEVER see adults dressed up in witch dress and giving an ovation.

It's my view that children books and adults are an odd mix.
 

Rien

New Member
I think that has more to do with the fact that the first few books were very children-oriented. When they were coming out, I was younger than Harry and adored the books. Now that they're finishing, I'm older than he is, and I still love them, but there's no doubt that the books grew up along with the audience. My parents both love the books, only my mother thinks that they're a little too violent and dark for her tastes. I know a lot of adults that only watched the movies for the first few but highly enjoy the later books, because the content shifted along with JKRs maturing audience. Yes, a lot of children love the books, but most of them can't understand a great deal of the material (without someone older helping them) from the fourth book onward. My ex-priest reads these books, as does her son, Thomas. She lets him come to her with questions--which his many of. He's nine, and he can't work through his mind how Harry does some of the less good things that he does, some of the things that Dumbledore or Voldemort say, or what's happening in a scene.

The first few books are children's books, the last few probably aren't, not really. But they're in a children's series, so they're seen that way. That's my guess. ^_^
 

SevenWritez

New Member
Yeah, um...even with Order of the Phoenix and on, Harry Potter never felt "dark," for me; I always cringed when someone told me it was maturing, but maybe that's only because the characters, to me, have always felt like 2D cut outs. Don't get me wrong, I still loved the final book despite my complaints.

Oh, and to Eyez: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19922579/

That's how much.
 

WoundedThorns

New Member
Some points that I did not get:

- I don't get the fact about Harry having his mum's eyes being important. What did I miss?
- There was something Rowling said about someone who would surprisingly do magic in the book right?
- And Fawkes just disappeared?

Snape loved Lily - he asked Harry to look at him while he was dying so he could look into his eyes. (he has his mom's eyes) so essentially he died looking into the eyes of the person he loved.

i'm not sure about the magic - maybe Hagrid?
 

mb06

New Member
After reading the Deathly Hallows, I'm still going to say that the Prisoner of Azkaban still reigns number one with me. I also would've liked to have seen some more of the loose ends tied up... how George is coping without Fred, a bit more insight into the orphan Ted, the rest of the Weasleys...
I don't like how Percy came back in the end to fight with Harry and the Order. It made it a bit over the top in the "happily ever after" department. A rogue relative makes the plot a bit more realistic to me.
 

stephiebaby

kickbox
Snape loved Lily - he asked Harry to look at him while he was dying so he could look into his eyes. (he has his mom's eyes) so essentially he died looking into the eyes of the person he loved.

I didn't think of it this way, I was confused over the "Look...at....me" that Snape whispered. It makes sense now. Thanks.
 

Athenean Reader

New Member
Since we 're talikng about HP being really a book for children, in my opinion, we should consider these:
  • Harry thinks profoundly about death just before he enters the Forest. Such thoughts are by no means addressed to children! Maybe JK slipped slightly at this point.
  • The whole Dumbledore-Snape-Voldemort relationship, along with Hallows and Horcruxes are really complicated and I am not quite sure that very young children would be able to fully understand them.
The end, however, appeals much to young children because the good defeats the evil, with a few casualties.
 
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