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Must read classics

Discussion in 'General Book Discussion' started by Violanthe, Jan 24, 2006.

  1. Violanthe

    Violanthe New Member

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    No Shakespeare?
     
  2. JRB88

    JRB88 New Member

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    Three of My all time favorite Classics:

    Bram Stokers' Dracula- thrilling and written in the most clever format

    Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland-extremely funny, and not just for small children

    Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray- not sure why but so captivating and interesting.
     
  3. -Carlos-

    -Carlos- New Member

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    Currently Reading:
    The Drawing of the Three by Stephen King
    Lord of the Flies by William Golding and the works of John Steinbeck.
     
  4. Mattyj

    Mattyj New Member

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    I must agree
     
  5. Tiffany

    Tiffany New Member

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    I agree with a lot of the suggestions made so far...
    (you've got to know your Bible for reference, anyhow)
    Here are some authors I think shouldn't be missed:
    Homer, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Dickens, Wilde, Conrad, Wharton, Joyce, Faulkner, Nabokov, Borges...
     
  6. Samerron

    Samerron New Member

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    Currently Reading:
    Many Books ( http://bit.ly/5Xkxgb )
    Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne.
    I would consider it an amazing classical piece of writting.
     
  7. steffee

    steffee Active Member

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    Why?

    Why would someone reading this thread rush out and buy one of Steinbeck's novels based on these comments?

    Why? Any in particular?
     
  8. -Carlos-

    -Carlos- New Member

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    You can go wrong with Steinbeck that's why.
     
  9. Jackel003

    Jackel003 kickbox

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    Currently Reading:
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    My only experience with Steinbeck was a boring one and I won't be revisting anytime soon. I really disliked Of Mice and Men. I thought it was a dull topic to write about and I couldn't get into it. 2 poor workers travel around the south during the depression in search of farming jobs with annoying dialect? No thanks.
     
  10. -Carlos-

    -Carlos- New Member

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    Sorry to hear that Jackel003. I would say to give him another try. You might like him a second time around.
     
  11. DiscoDan

    DiscoDan New Member

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    Currently Reading:
    Christopher Paolini - Eragon
    The Great Gatsby, I actually liked it. And of course To Kill A Mockingbird.
     
  12. Jackel003

    Jackel003 kickbox

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    Currently Reading:
    House Of Leaves - Mark Z. Danielewski
    I've heard good things about Grapes Of Wrath. I may give that a shot.
     
  13. Netherbard

    Netherbard New Member

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    William Somerset Maugham's sellection: -- Ten Novels and Their Authors

    Tom Jones by Henry Fielding
    Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
    Le Rouge et le Noir by Stendhal
    Le Père
    Goriot by Honoré de Balzac
    David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
    Madame Bovary by Gustav Flaubert
    Moby-Dick by Herman Melville
    Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
    The Brothers Karamazov by Dostoevsky
    War and Peace by Tolstoy.

    * * * * * * * * * *

    I've only read six of the above, and now working on one.

     
  14. Bluraven

    Bluraven Member

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    Currently Reading:
    The Bad Beginning, by Lemony Snicket
    If you're thinking of giving Steinbeck a try, you might like The Red Pony, as its short and doesn't have as much of the awkward slang in it.

    And yes...I did forget to mention Shakespeare...the Master, as I think of him. He is oft quoted and imitated...but never out-bested!
     
  15. Shelly

    Shelly New Member

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    Perfume - Partrick Suskind
    1984/Animal Farm- George Orwell
    The Murders in the Rue Morgue - E.A.Poe
     
  16. lady.cordelia

    lady.cordelia New Member

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    just wanted to mention that in another post about which book people must read i had put Alexander Dolgun - An American in the Gulag and wanted to let you know that Solzhenitsyn actually interviewed Dolgun and used some of his stories from the gulag in the book about Denisovich. That character is an imalgum of sorts of various people who Solzhenitsyn interviewed who had also survived the Gulag (as they got together often and kind of helped each other deal with it I guess). great book. short and easy to read.

    I would go with anything by Austen, Bronte sisters, Steinbeck, a few Hemingway and Poe (not all) and can't think to list them right now, To Kill a Mockingbirg, Shakespeare, and on and on and on. I agree with a lot of what has been posted, with the exception of Dan Brown :( - blech

    Here is a great link for looking at books. There is one section for 1000 great books for classical learning (and it goes from elementary to high school or in classical education it would be from grammar to rhetoric) and there is another section for 100 great books and it is divided by different genre. http://www.classical-homeschooling.org/celoop/1000.html I use this a lot with homeschooling my girls. Awesome list!
     
  17. lady.cordelia

    lady.cordelia New Member

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    don't just go by age (on the site i listed above), though, as many books are listed for advanced readers, as many classical educators use a rigorous approach to learning through literature
     
  18. Miss_Tolstoy

    Miss_Tolstoy New Member

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    Currently Reading:
    Crime and Punishment- Dostoevsky, Fyodor
    Im am very satisified to see how much To kill a mocking bird has been recomended. It really is superb. I think first I recommend a bit of Tess of the Durbivills by Thomas Hardy as he hasnt had a mention yet although steer well clear of Return of the native as it is a bit stodgy and pointless, like wading through poridge. Then Id recomend the following authors who are my favourite:
    Jane austin- read everything by here.
    Charlotte Bronte: Read Jane eyer the other bronte sisters are good but this is the best.
    George Orwell: obviously animal farm and Nineteen-eighty-four but 'Down and out in Paris and London' is a lovely little interesting book.
    Leo Tolstoy: So far war and peace and Anna Karenina are all that I may recomend from my own experice but Im loving them so much I dont want to stop until I've read everything by him.

    What I would advice is look through these suggestions people have made, get synopsis and choose something that seems interesting. I guarentee if you start with something good picking the next 'classic' to read beacomes an easy and natural process.:)

    And one more thing..... The divinci code is NOT a classic
     
  19. Shai

    Shai New Member

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    I've never understood why education systems the world over have decided to force Of Mice and Men upon an entire generation. (It's not a terrible book), but:
    1) At the time of its publishing it wasn't granted many good reviews
    2) IT WAS AN EXPERIMENTAL NOVEL - it was an experiment by S. in trying to create a style of novel that could be directly transformed into a play. In this regard (See, S.'s America and Americans) it was a failure.
    3) It's still not that good

    So many people I know don't give S. another chance after reading oM&M. Instead, people should read either his brilliant (and nobel prize worthy) epics Grapes of Wrath and East of Eden. Or, if you wanna go with something shorter, even his Cannery Row is a great read.
     
  20. lady.cordelia

    lady.cordelia New Member

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    thanks for seconding (or thirding) that davinci code isn't a classic. blech.

    and i forgot about tess of the d'urbervilles. it was required reading in school, but i liked it.
     

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