1. Welcome to BookAndReader!

    We LOVE books and hope you'll join us in sharing your favorites and experiences along with your love of reading with our community. Registering for our site is free and easy, just CLICK HERE!

    Already a member and forgot your password? Click here.

My Weekly Editorial

Discussion in 'Writers' Room' started by Dogmatix, May 18, 2006.

  1. Dogmatix

    Dogmatix New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Messages:
    644
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    The 13 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear Walter Moers
    Besides being a veterinarian I also write a weekly editorial for The Times News on vet medicine. I've decided to start posting it here. There will be a new one each Thursday. I will not give ANY veterinary advice here so please don't ask for it. Just want to share my column with you all.

    Don’t Let Your Older Pet Suffer in Silence

    Thanks to better medicines, balanced commercial diets, and the increasing importance of the human animal bond, more pets are living well into their golden years. Owners are more concerned with their pet’s wellbeing and veterinarians are more proactive in recognizing the early signs of disease. Senior pets have their own unique health concerns and owners need to educate themselves about the early signs that a problem may be brewing.

    Age is not a disease and a healthy older pet should be active and happy. When a cat or dog starts “slowing down” it’s time to consider arthritis. Arthritis is a degenerative disease of synovial joints. Synovial joints are ones in which the ends of two bones that oppose each other are coated with caps of cartilage and encased in a fluid filled capsule. Knees, hips, and elbows are all synovial joints. Arthritis starts when cartilage is damaged or worn during use or as a result of trauma. Congenital bone deformation and increased joint laxity also contribute to the onset of arthritis. Once the process starts the joint becomes inflamed and painful. The cartilage cushion deteriorates and the joint fluid loses its lubricating properties. Eventually permanent changes occur in the bones themselves.


    Although most commonly recognized in larger dogs any dog or cat is susceptible to painful degenerative arthritis. In dogs early signs of arthritis include reluctance to go up and down stairs, tiring easily during exercise, sleeping more frequently, and difficulty in rising from a seated position. In more severe cases dogs may limp or cry out, walk with a stiff gait and even growl or snap when handled. Because of their smaller size and natural agility the signs of arthritis in cats are more subtle. Reluctance to jump onto counters, increased time spent sleeping, resistance to petting, or subtle behavioral changes can all be signs that your cat is in discomfort. Only in the most severe cases will cats limp or cry out in pain.

    Ideally arthritis prevention starts at home. Studies have shown that maintaining a healthy weight can delay the onset of arthritis. Feed a good quality commercial diet and keep snacking to a minimum. A regular exercise program will help to keep your pet’s weight down and maintain joint flexibility. If your pet is at a good weight keep it that way. If she’s overweight get her started on diet and exercise program right away.

    Once your pet starts showing symptoms it’s time to see the vet. Millions of prescriptions for arthritis medication have been written and there are many brands for your veterinarian to choose from. Much like human arthritis formulations these medications work to decrease inflammation and pain within the joint. For many pets these drugs are truly life extending. Currently there are no medications specifically labeled for treating arthritis in cats. Some medications are better than others for cats and veterinarians are using them successfully, but this needs to be done with close supervision and regular monitoring.

    Your veterinarian may also recommend a nutritional supplement that includes glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate. These products supply the building blocks for maintaining healthy joint cartilage. Since these products are not drugs they are not subject to the same testing regulations and not all veterinarians agree as to their effectiveness. One thing that most veterinarians do agree on is that supplements are best used in the earliest stages of arthritis when adequate cartilage remains.

    If your pet is slowing down it may not just be old age. Pay close attention to your pet and learn to recognize the subtle signs of early arthritis. Remember age is not a disease and there is no reason for your healthy older pet to suffer in silence.
     
  2. Dogmatix

    Dogmatix New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Messages:
    644
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    The 13 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear Walter Moers
    This Week's Editorial

    Here is my editorial for the week:

    Pet Ownership is a Serious Responsibility

    Unfortunately part of being a veterinarian is dealing with animal abuse. This week I saw a terrible case of neglect and I couldn’t help but write about it. The case involved a young male dog, about 4 years old. One of my best clients, a responsible and caring pet owner, brought him to me after begging his owner give him up and allow her to seek medical care on his behalf.

    When he arrived at my hospital “Otter” was hunched over at the end of his leash. He was nearly hairless, very painful and barely able to walk. He cried out in pain at each step. At 60 pounds “Otter” should have weighed about 100. His hips protruded at sharp cruel angles and his head looked unnaturally large on his withered frame. Otter was covered in scabs and had a severe case of mange. He’d been living in this condition for at least two years before my client was able to rescue him.

    “Otter” stayed at my hospital for two days during treatment. My caring staff felt badly for him and made him a bed of comforters, leaving his cage door open so he was free to interact with them. At lunch breaks he would wobble out of his bed and quietly beg for handouts. He was sweet and gentle and amazingly, despite cruel treatment at the hands of his owner, he still loved people and sought petting and interaction. During his stay he was treated for heartworm disease, intestinal parasites, mange, fleas and ticks. Radiographs were performed and revealed severe degenerative joint disease in both of his hips and two bullets in his thighs. I sent him home with a prescription for pain medication and once he regains his strength and some weight he’ll be back for surgery on his badly damaged back legs.

    Clearly “Otter” was severely neglected. A disturbing part of this story is that his owner told my client that she thought there was nothing wrong with the dog and this is why no veterinary care was ever sought. It never ceases to amaze me that people can look at an animal like this poor dog every day and fail to see suffering. Pet ownership is a serious responsibility. Difficult financial circumstances, busy schedules, and unfortunate life events do not excuse pet owners from providing adequate care for their pets. Pets need social interaction, adequate and nutritious food, clean water, and a minimum of veterinary care. If a pet owner finds she is no longer able to care for a pet then it’s her responsibility to find a solution. Possibly the pet needs a new home. The Humane Society has a financial assistance program which helps pet owners with unforeseen pet medical expenses. Doing nothing is simply not acceptable.

    Animal neglect is not only cruel it’s illegal. Fortunately laws exist that specifically state that neglecting your pet, allowing unjustifiable suffering, pain or death, and intentional animal cruelty, are all illegal and punishable by fines and possible time in jail. According to Tamee Penley, Assistant Supervisor of Burlington Animal Services, approximately 15 tickets are issued each week within Burlington City limits for violations of animal welfare. “While outright cruelty justifies animal seizure, tickets may be issued for lack of fresh water, inadequate shelter, inadequate food, or failure to provide medical care. Some people do the absolute minimum to get by. That’s just not enough and it constitutes cruelty.” says Penley.

    “Otter” is one lucky dog and my client is a hero. As for his past owner, I don’t know her circumstances but I am glad she finally gave “Otter” a second chance at a life in a loving and responsible home with someone committed to his care.
     
  3. Doug Johnson

    Doug Johnson kickbox

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2005
    Messages:
    391
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    The Stand
    Pretty good; my retriever has arthritis, so I found it interesting.
     
  4. Poppy1

    Poppy1 Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2006
    Messages:
    2,217
    Likes Received:
    9
    You're doing a wonderful job drm :)
     
  5. Dogmatix

    Dogmatix New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Messages:
    644
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    The 13 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear Walter Moers
    This week's editorial: (couple days late)


    Protect your Pet from Dangerous Tick Bite Diseases




    It’s summer, well almost. Time for sunshine, warm weather and more outdoor activities. For dog lovers it’s a great time to take Fido for a run in the park, a swim in the lake, or a hike in the mountains. Unfortunately, it’s also the beginning of tick season and my impression is it’s going to be a bad one this year. The more time you and your dog spend outside the higher the risk of picking up one or more of these creepy little bugs.

    The reason ticks creep us out so much is that they live by feeding off the blood of both humans and animals. Ticks have big appetites and a female can suck so much blood that she’ll grow to 1000 times her original weight. On the flip side ticks can fast for a year or more and survive to take yet another fresh blood meal. These hardy insects and can be found most places in the United States but are particularly concentrated along the east coast. Lucky us.

    Not only are ticks nasty little blood suckers they can also carry and transmit disease to their unlucky victims. There are many species of ticks and each one carries its own set of diseases. Here is a list of some of the more common ones.
    Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever is caused by a specialized bacteria, Rickettsia rickettsii. Both dogs and humans are susceptible. Symptoms of infection are quite variable but include fever, depression, rash, anorexia, painful joints, and sometimes death.
    Ehrlichia: Ehrlichia is another specialized bacteria that attacks white blood cells, causing a form of immune suppression. Symptoms of infection include fever, depression, weight loss, and anorexia. Both humans and their pets are susceptible.
    Lyme Disease: Lyme disease is caused by the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi. Both people and dogs (very rarely cats) are susceptible to infection. Symptoms of infection include fever, anorexia, painful joints, and swollen lymph nodes.
    Cytauxzoonosis: A danger to cats only, Cytauxzoonosis is a tiny protozoan blood parasite spread by the bite of a tick. This is a particularly deadly disease in which there is no truly effective treatment. Most cats infected by these protozoa will sadly die within a week.
    Babesia:Babesia is another type of protozoan that lives inside red blood cells. Both humans and pets are susceptible to infection. Babesia infections can cause anemia, anorexia, and a high fever. Some animals can remain asymptomatic but others can become sick enough to die.
    Avoidance and Prevention are Key
    To keep your dog protected from disease carrying ticks use a veterinary approved topical flea and tick product such as Frontline Plus or K-9 Advantix every 30 days. Avoid over the counter products which are far less effective and can sometimes even be dangerous. In general ticks need to bite and remain attached for some hours before disease transmission can occur. That’s why checking for ticks and promptly removing them is so important. Check you dog daily for ticks and remove any you find using a pair of clean tweezers. Wash the bite area with warm soap and water and wash your hands after handling a tick. If the tick has been attached call you vet’s office for advice about what to do next. Your veterinarian may ask to see the tick for identification purposes and if so you can drop it into a jar of alcohol for sanitary transport.
    During these warm months don’t be afraid to enjoy the outdoors. God knows we could all use the exercise and fresh air. Use common sense and remember to check your dog for ticks every day.
     
  6. Dogmatix

    Dogmatix New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Messages:
    644
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    The 13 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear Walter Moers
    Okay BAR this one requires a bit of explanation. A couple of weeks ago I treated a dog that was shot in the chest and then nearly buried alive. The media got wind of it and they swamped the hospital all week. Here's my editorial on it.
    After Allison

    It’s been quite a crazy whirlwind here at the hospital the last couple of weeks. The television and printed press were in and out our front door daily covering the story of Allison, the mother dog shot in the chest, and her puppies very closely. They returned last Friday to film the adoptions and interview the carefully selected new owners. All week long my email box was swamped with offers of money, housing and other forms of assistance. Some people were angry and demanded retribution; others were merely saddened and in disbelief. Concerned animal lovers came from hours away just to see Allison and her pups and to donate money and food on her behalf. The phones were ringing off the hook and the line of those wanting to help in any way was long.

    It was an overwhelming and heartwarming show of concern and it deeply touched both me and my staff. When terrible things like this occur it reinforces to me the reasons I became a veterinarian; to alleviate animal suffering and to strengthen the human animal bond in a way that is beneficial to both pets and their owners. I know that Allison and her pups went to excellent, loving homes and will be well cared for. That’s the part of the story I have made peace with.

    But the story of animal cruelty doesn’t end there. What about now? What about after Allison? Allison’s case was unique only in that some anonymous person from a local rescue agency was mad enough about it to call the media. The reality is that cruelty happens every day. Here at the emergency hospital we see patients almost monthly that have been intentionally shot. Unfortunately, it’s not just shootings that we see; there are many forms of animal cruelty. This spring I lost a canine patient to antifreeze poisoning. The owner’s neighbor had been baiting stray cats with antifreeze laced meat for weeks as a means of population control. I’ve treated dogs with collars so tight they had to be surgically removed from the flesh of their neck. Last week a kindly policeman brought me a soaking wet four month old puppy in the middle of the night. His tail had been cut off with a knife. Other cases are just too gruesome to even put into print.

    It’s important to realize that most cruelty happens in silence and no one ever knows about it. County animal control is terribly under funded, overworked, and short staffed. Many cases simply go uninvestigated for lack of human and financial resources. Citizens are often reluctant to get involved and turn a blind eye to suffering. Even some veterinarians fear alienating their clients or worse, retribution from angry pet owners, so they fail to report cruelty when they suspect it. It’s a vicious and shameful cycle, but something has got to be done.

    If you were touched by Allison’s story take action. If you suspect animal cruelty report it. If you fail to see action, report it again. Use your voting power to support legislation for funding in Alamance County to expand Animal Control’s jurisdiction, services and budget. Tell your veterinarian that you are concerned about animal welfare. Teach your children to treat animals with kindness and how to recognize cruelty. For every Allison there are a thousand just like her with no one on their side. Don’t keep silent. Take action and do your part to end the cycle. If you were upset last week, stay upset. Use that energy to make a change for the animals that come after Allison.
     
  7. Dogmatix

    Dogmatix New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Messages:
    644
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    The 13 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear Walter Moers
    This Thursday's editorial.

    Anesthesia is Safer than Ever for Pets
    For some pet owners the word anesthesia makes their knees weak. I’ve seen grown adults clutch their pets with white knuckled, trembling hands at the mere mention of this word. Unfortunately, anesthesia is an irreplaceable and necessary part of veterinary medicine. Many common procedures such as dental cleanings, spaying, neutering, and other beneficial or downright lifesaving procedures require the use of anesthesia. Some pet owners are so frightened that they’ll just dig in their heels and refuse to let their pet be anesthetized. These pets are missing out on much needed care because of their owner’s misconceptions about anesthesia. Here’s the straight talk on why anesthesia is safer today than ever before.

    Examination: A preanesthetic examination is the first step in ensuring your pet’s safety. Before any procedure is undertaken a veterinarian performs a thorough physical exam. She’ll listen to your pet’s heart and lungs, take your pet’s temperature, and feel her pulses. Palpation will allow your veterinarian to feel the shape of the abdominal organs, and the size of lymph nodes. A brief neurologic exam will also be performed.

    Blood Testing: The standard of care in veterinary medicine has risen to a level that all veterinarians should require some blood testing prior to anesthetizing your pet. Your veterinarian will check your pet’s liver and kidney function, red and white blood cell counts, hydration, blood sugar, and blood clotting time. Testing helps your veterinarian determine your pet’s overall fitness for anesthesia and helps her design a safe anesthetic protocol.

    Monitoring: Veterinarians employ many sophisticated devices to monitor your pet under anesthesia. These include pulse oximetry – to measure blood oxygen, electrocardiogram – to monitor heart rate and rhythm, capnography – to measure adequacy of ventilation, and blood pressure – to monitor cardiac function. More important than all of these however is a qualified assistant dedicated solely to your pet’s welfare during anesthesia. This assistant maintains the intravenous catheter, monitors gum color and body temperature, assesses level of consciousness, and tends to monitoring devices. An attentive nurse and some combination of these devices greatly increase your pet’s safety during any procedure.

    Pain Control: Even after an invasive procedure animals may try to conceal their pain, regardless of how severe it may be. Imagine having major surgery and receiving no pain medication! Research shows that pain negatively affects healing time so veterinarians are trained to be proactive and assume that pain is present. Most will administer analgesia before, during and after any procedure which might be painful. A veterinarian will usually send pain medication home with you. If yours doesn’t, ask for it! Ideally your pet should feel as little pain as possible.

    Recovery: Hopefully your pet will be home with you the same night. Complications occur most frequently within the first 24-48 hours after a procedure so round the clock attentive care is needed. If your pet is too unstable or painful to send home your veterinarian may transfer him/her to a care facility that remains open for overnight monitoring and treatment. If your pet is sent home your veterinarian will advise you on what signs indicate trouble and what to do should they occur.

    Anesthesia is, of course, not without some small risk, but this shouldn’t stop you from consenting to procedures beneficial to your pet’s health. If you have concerns address them with your veterinarian before you allow your pet to be anesthetized. Ask her about your pet’s overall health, the type of anesthesia being used, how your pet will be monitored and what type, if any, pain medications will be used. Having the answers to these important questions will decrease your fear of anesthesia.
     
  8. pontalba

    pontalba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2005
    Messages:
    4,345
    Likes Received:
    148
    Currently Reading:
    dithering...
    Thanks for posting these Dogmatix. As an owner of cats and dogs, its nice to see something like this posted here. Everything you have posted jives with my 50 odd years of living with critters. :)
     
  9. muggle

    muggle New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2005
    Messages:
    1,796
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would like to complement you on taking the time to post the editorials which should be helpful to many pet owners.
     
  10. Dogmatix

    Dogmatix New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Messages:
    644
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    The 13 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear Walter Moers
    Thanks guys. I've had this editorial column in The Time News for a couple of years now, on top of being a vet. My editor mentioned that I should try for syndication so that may be the next step for me. We'll see.
     
  11. muggle

    muggle New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2005
    Messages:
    1,796
    Likes Received:
    0
    Will you still post with us when/if you become a "celebrity".;) Go for it, a syndication would be wonderful, and think of all the better wines you could buy with the money. :)
     
  12. Dogmatix

    Dogmatix New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Messages:
    644
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    The 13 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear Walter Moers
    Whoops I'm way late this week.:eek: Here it is:

    Cat’s Bloody Lip puts her in Intensive Care

    Kitty was missing and her owners were worried. Thankfully she made her way home after just a couple of days. Her relieved owners shuttled her inside, glad to have her back. On her return they noticed a small scratch on her lip which had scabbed over. She had no other injuries and was hungry and glad to be home. Slowly at first, then more and more profusely, that tiny scratch started bleeding. By morning there was blood all over and Kitty’s owners found her lying very still and holding her paw tightly over her bloody lip. Concerned, they promptly rushed her to the hospital.

    The initial history they gave me wasn’t overly concerning. A bloody lip hardly qualifies as a major emergency. Things changed quickly though, once I got the carrier door open. Inside crouched Kitty. She was alert and responsive but her mouth was a bloody mess and there was no scabbing or clotting at all. I wiped away the majority of the blood and noticed the tiny cut. Then I lifted her lip and saw her gums were as white as snow. Kitty had obviously lost a lot of blood. Where had it all gone? Besides her tiny cut I could find no other injuries. She did have a heart murmur though, and that can sometimes indicate severe anemia. Then her lip started bleeding again.

    “Okay”, I said. “We need to take a blood sample right away. I also want to prepare Kitty for a blood transfusion while we figure out what’s going on here”. Kitty’s owners were shocked but compliant and willing as I whisked Kitty away to the treatment area. After a blood count and clotting test I had my answer. Kitty had eaten rat poison and she was literally bleeding to death through that tiny cut on her lip. I started the lifesaving transfusion and administered a Vitamin K injection, the antidote to this type of poison. Then I went to talk to Kitty’s owners.

    There are two types of rat poisoning. The type that Kitty had eaten works by disrupting the body’s ability to activate the components of blood clotting. It’s a complicated process which is dependant on Vitamin K. Fortunately, if diagnosed in time the antidote, Vitamin K injection and oral supplementation, is highly effective. Kitty’s owners hadn’t used any rat bait so they were shocked to learn that she’d been exposed. She must have been bleeding most of the time she was missing and then more so overnight while they slept. When she arrived at the hospital her red blood cell count was less than half of normal. She was extremely lucky to be alive.

    I reported my diagnosis and Kitty’s owners were shocked by how close she’d been to death from such a seemingly insignificant cut. Fortunately, she responded very well to her treatments. Later that evening she had a nice firm scab on her lip and was eating and grooming herself. I decided to keep Kitty in intensive care for a couple of days and she continued to improve. Eventually I sent her home with a month’s worth of Vitamin K supplements. Reports are she’s doing well.

    What’s the lesson here? You can never be too careful. If you have a concern about your pet, no matter how small, call your veterinarian right away. Kitty’s owners saved her life with their quick thinking. If they’d gone to work for even a few hours that day Kitty probably would have died from something seemingly as simple as a tiny scratch on her lip.
     
  13. Dogmatix

    Dogmatix New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Messages:
    644
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    The 13 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear Walter Moers
    Here's the latest serving:)

    “Cherry eye”; if you’ve seen a dog with one you know what I’m talking about. This term describes a red, wet, shiny mass present in the corner of the eye that looks rather like, you guessed it, a cherry. A cherry eye can appear suddenly or grow over time. It can be present in one or both eyes. Cherry eyes are usually uncomfortable, causing squinting and thick yellow discharge from the affected eye. Regardless of the presence or absence of pain, cherry eye always requires surgical correction.

    So, what is a cherry eye? A cherry eye is not a tumor, or a ruptured eye and it’s not specifically a sign of infection. It’s actually a normal structure, located in an abnormal location. All eyes, even ours, require constant wetting by tears to maintain healthy, normal function. A dog has two tear glands near each of its eyes. One under the top lid and one just below the eye, near the snout. Sometimes called the gland of the third eyelid, this tear gland is what forms the cherry eye. In affected dogs the gland breaks free from its anchor to the underlying connective tissue and travels upward, prolapsing into what is commonly called a cherry eye. The condition is more common in some breeds of dog, but any breed can be affected.

    Once the gland prolapses it will eventually begin to swell and become trapped in this exposed location. The gland rubs against the eyeball and begins to irritate the eye’s surface (the cornea). Tear production can be negatively affected causing itchy, dry eyes. Self induced trauma from rubbing and infection of the gland are also common. Over time damage will spread from the gland to the eye itself. In untreated cases severe eye infections, corneal ulcers, and even vision loss can occur.

    Years ago veterinarians would treat cherry eye by simply cutting out the gland. This method was quick and simple to perform, requiring little technical skill. It provided immediate resolution to owner’s concerns about how awful a cherry eye looked. Unfortunately, when this important gland is removed a dog’s tear production drops significantly. If tear production is insufficient then dry eye results. Dry eyes are painful and very susceptible to infection and ulceration. Dogs with this condition require a lifetime of eye medications, and frequent trips to the veterinarian’s office for eye exams.

    The treatment most veterinarians now perform is called a tack down procedure. With this procedure a very small incision is made in the skin below the lower eye lid. A tunnel is then created upward and towards the prolapsed gland. Suture is fed through the tunnel to the tissue of the gland and back towards the incision. Then the suture is pulled taught and the gland is tacked down into its natural position under the lower lid. Finally the small skin incision is closed. With this procedure the gland is returned to its normal location, the cherry eye is resolved, and normal tear production is maintained.

    In severe cases of cherry eye, if corneal damage is present, or in cases in which surgery has failed to permanently correct a cherry eye, an ophthalmologist should be consulted. These specially trained veterinarians may repeat the tack down procedure or perform a more complicated technique, involving the partial excision of tissue overlaying the prolapsed gland.

    Cherry eye is a condition which really does require surgical correction. A “wait and see” approach is not a good idea and the earlier the intervention the less chance for irreversible damage to either the tear gland or the eye itself.
     
  14. Dogmatix

    Dogmatix New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Messages:
    644
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    The 13 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear Walter Moers
    Today's article

    “Smush-face” Dogs

    We American’s love our “smush-face” dogs: Bulldog, Pekinese, Pug, Boxer, Shih-Tzu and from my home town, the Boston terrier. The anatomical term for “smush-faced” is brachycephalic (short-head). The nick-name “smush-face” comes from their short snouts which sometimes make these dogs appear as if they’ve run into a brick wall without slowing down. As a group these dogs are bred for looks with round skulls, high foreheads and large, forward facing eyes that are as expressive as a child’s. Brachycephalic dogs lack the elongated, sharp snout of more wolf-like dogs such as the German shepherd, or Collie. In general they’re intelligent, affectionate and make excellent family pets. If you own one of these charming breeds or are considering getting one here is some important information to consider.

    Hot Summer Weather
    Brachycephalic dogs are far more sensitive to hot, humid weather, such as we often suffer here in North Carolina. Given access to adequate shade, air conditioning and clean, fresh water this isn’t a problem for most dogs. Humans sweat when they get hot but a dog cools itself by panting. An open mouth and rapid breathing cause the evaporation of saliva. It’s like when you get out of the pool, on a hot day; evaporation from your wet skin can make you chilly even though it’s hot outside. Panting is very effective at keeping a dog’s temperature in a normal range when the weather is hot.

    While panting is an easy task for dogs with long snouts, it requires increased effort for “smush-face” dogs. Brachycephalic dogs not only have a shorter snout they often have an elongated soft palette. The soft palette is the tissue at the back of the mouth, on the top. If the soft palette is elongated it can drape across the back of the throat and partially obstruct the opening to the trachea (the windpipe). This partial obstruction makes panting more difficult, decreasing its effectiveness. Not only is the trachea often obstructed in these dogs, it’s often very narrow and sometimes weak enough to collapse with increased respiratory effort. All these factors make it easy for brachycephalic dogs to become overheated, suffer heat collapse or even heat stroke. Elongated palette can be surgically corrected.

    Eye Health
    The wonderful expressions of a “smush-face” dog have as much to do with their round, forward facing eyes, as their pushed in snouts. While large eyes are lovely and soulful they also predispose brachycephalic dogs to a host of eye diseases. It may make you squirm to hear it but I often treat these dogs on emergency when one of their eyeballs has literally popped out of their heads. Unfortunately because their eye sockets are so shallow and their lids are open so wide it happens all the time.

    Another problem with these large eyes is corneal trauma. Some brachycephalic dogs have trouble closing their eyes all the way, making them at increased risk for injury. If a “smush-face” dog has long fur on the snout it often lays right across the eyeball. This chronic irritation can easily lead to infection, pain, ulceration and even rupture. A surgery called Medial Canthoplasty can correct this problem by partially closing the eyelids to protect the eyeball from trauma.

    Skin
    Finally all that “smushiness” can lead to skin infections as moisture and debris collect between the wrinkles. Keeping the face cleaned and dry can help, but in extreme cases plastic surgery may be required to remove excess skin folds and prevent the most severe of infections. Yes, that’s right, I said plastic surgery. Welcome to the 21st century of veterinary medicine!
     
  15. Dogmatix

    Dogmatix New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Messages:
    644
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    The 13 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear Walter Moers
    I'm early this week

    I'm early this week. Well on time actually. Here it is:

    New Insulin Offers Hope for Many Diabetic Cats


    Diabetes is an unfortunately common disease in our feline friends. Here at the hospital we diagnose and treat a lot of diabetic cats on an outpatient basis. In the E.R. we receive diabetics in crisis; with dangerously high or low blood sugar. Frequently these cats will be terribly dehydrated when they come in. They may be having seizures and often they’ll have urinary or dental infections. When diabetic cats get sick they’re usually suffering from a condition called Diabetic Keto Acidosis or DKA for short. DKA is a very dangerous condition requiring rapid and aggressive therapy for survival. Blood sugar must be normalized, fluids must be replaced, electrolytes must be balanced, and infections must be resolved. All of this has to happen in a short period of time to reduce the risk of mortality. DKA can occur in diabetic cats that are undiagnosed, or untreated. It’s also common in cats that need an insulin dose adjustment, have a second underlying disease, or have developed an infection.

    Last year Eli Lilly, a manufacturer of human insulin announced that they were discontinuing two of their products; Humulin-L and Humulin-U. It was a real blow to the veterinary community because a large majority of feline and canine patients take one of these insulin products. Humulin-U was typically used as a once per day insulin, Humulin-L as a twice per day insulin. Of the two products Humulin-L is more commonly prescribed. Since these products are no longer available veterinarians now have to look for newer, alternative choices.

    There are currently no insulin products available which are capable of exactly replacing Humulin-L in potency and duration of action. This means that all the diabetic cats who currently are receiving this product will need to be placed on a new type of insulin. For felines there are really two good choices; PZI insulin and Glargine. Glargine is a fairly new type of human insulin. It’s relatively inexpensive, can be purchased at any pharmacy, and for some cats it can successfully be used as a once a day injection. At a recent meeting of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine many veterinarians were expressing much excitement about the effectiveness of this product in controlling feline diabetes. Some were actually reporting their feline patients were achieving complete diabetic remission after just a few weeks on Glargine insulin.

    It’s important to realize that if your cat currently takes Humulin-L, or any of the other recently discontinued insulin formulations, switching to another form of insulin isn’t as simple as switching brands of food. Since all insulin works differently your cat will need close observation during the transition to Glargine to reduce the risk of complications. Usually this means serial blood tests to determine blood glucose levels during the first 2-8 weeks. Once an effective and safe dose is established blood tests are recommended every 6 months. Good dental care and frequent urine cultures are also recommended for ideal diabetic management.

    Another very important aspect to managing feline diabetes is diet. It has been established that controlling carbohydrate intake in diabetic felines greatly increases glucose control. Some cats that have only mild diabetes can actually maintain good blood glucose control with diet alone. The current recommendation for diabetic cats is low carbohydrate to protein ratio. Several diets are available which fit this profile.

    Glargine is exciting to veterinarians that treat cats struggling with this debilitating and chronic disease. Its discovery and increased use combined with new research in controlled carbohydrate diets offers much hope for better control of feline diabetes.
     
  16. Dogmatix

    Dogmatix New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Messages:
    644
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    The 13 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear Walter Moers
    This week's article. It's local in it's scope but nevertheless here it is:

    Rabies is on the Rise in North Carolina
    Last week I went to see my physician to have my rabies titer checked. My last rabies vaccine was quite a while back so I wanted to be sure I was still safely protected. About 18 years ago I was bitten by a rabid cat and had to endure a series of 15 injections; something I never want to repeat! Nowadays most veterinary professionals and animal control officers are protected with this vaccination. Fortunately, my titer was still very high and I escaped re-vaccination this year.
    When I moved to North Carolina 6 years ago rabies wasn’t something most people were very concerned about, but that’s all changed now. There’s no denying it, rabies is here in North Carolina. Even scarier, it’s here in Alamance County. According to Carl Carroll, Director of Environmental Health for Alamance County, there have been two confirmed cases of rabid bats already this year. In the United States rabies is present in every state except Hawaii, with the largest concentration along the eastern coast. Worldwide rabies kills about 50,000 people and millions of animals every year.

    Rabies is a viral infection affecting the central nervous system. The most common method of infection is by bite wound and all mammals are susceptible to infection. This includes humans. When an animal or human is bitten by another carrying rabies, virus particles are deposited into the wound. The bite victim will remain asymptomatic for some time, showing no sign that it has been exposed. During this quiet period the virus migrates from the bite wound to the brain. This may take weeks or even months to occur. Once the brain becomes infected the symptoms of rabies emerge. These vary greatly and there are no “rules” about how a rabid animal will act. It is important to realize that you can’t tell an animal has rabies by looking at it! A few days before death large quantities of virus particles collect in the saliva and can be passed to another animal during a bite

    North Carolina law is very clear on rabies. Every dog and cat over 16 weeks of age must have a current rabies vaccination administered by a licensed veterinarian. Initial vaccination is valid for one year and subsequent vaccinations are valid for one to three years, depending on the vaccine manufacturer. If a dog or cat is found not to be vaccinated his owner will be directed by animal control to have that pet vaccinated immediately and may be subject to legal action. If an unvaccinated pet is exposed to a suspected rabid animal that pet can be lawfully confined for observation for six months at the owner’s expense. If an unvaccinated animal bites a person it must be quarantined and observed, also at the owner’s expense, for 10 days. Keeping your pet’s rabies vaccine current is much less expensive.

    The message here is to keep your pet vaccinated. If you have a regular veterinarian your pet will be vaccinated during annual examinations. If you don’t, there are several excellent veterinarians in the area that offer rabies vaccinations at reasonable prices ($5.00 - $17.00): Alamance Veterinary Hospital, Banfield the Pet Hospital, Burlington Animal Hospital, Central Carolina Veterinary Hospital and 24 Hour Animal Emergency, Elon Animal Hospital, Graham Animal Hospital, Mebane Pet Clinic, Mebane Veterinary Hospital, Piedmont Veterinary Hospital, Plaza Veterinary Hospital, Stoney Creek Veterinary Hospital, Town & Country Animal Hospital, Tri-County Veterinary Service, and Westbrook Animal Hospital. Most hospitals will ask that you call ahead to make an appointment. Rabies vaccine appointments usually take 10 minutes or less

    For more information on rabies in North Carolina check out: www.epi.state.nc.us/epi/rabies
     
  17. Dogmatix

    Dogmatix New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Messages:
    644
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    The 13 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear Walter Moers
    Today's article. Enjoy!

    Veterinary Acupuncture helps Handicapped Bulldog


    Matilda Patterson is a brat. At 12 pounds this cream colored French bulldog rules her owners Nancy and Cliff and her much larger siblings; Murray the Pitbull, Baby the Greyhound, Molly the Border collie, and Miss Lilly the Papillion, with a formidable iron paw. She chews and barks, steals shoes and toys and demands to have her belly rubbed. If she just wasn’t so darned cute she probably wouldn’t get away with her antics. What makes bratty Matilda so charming however isn’t her diminutive size but the fact that she was born with a severe congenital defect and yet she still manages to keep everyone in line.

    Since she was just a little pup Matilda has suffered from an unusual nervous condition which has robbed her of function in both her hind legs. Her front legs work perfectly well and she has normal sensation in her rear limbs but they don’t always do what her body asks. Fortunately her condition isn’t painful. On a wood floor Matilda looks like she’s skating on slippery ice as she slides her frantically peddling back legs behind her body. She does a bit better on grass and can stand for a few minutes at a time. Matilda also has some food allergies and a chronic problem with esophageal reflux (heartburn with vomiting). All in all she’s a real handful.

    The Patterson’s have taken Matilda to see many, veterinarians and veterinary specialists. Each time her condition has been puzzled over and slightly different treatments have been offered with varying degrees of success. She’s generally health and happy and her symptoms are fairly well controlled but her owners always want the best for her. About 6 months ago they decided to take Matilda to see a veterinary acupuncturist, Dr. Robin Scott DVM at Triangle Veterinary Hospital in Durham.

    So what is acupuncture and how does it work? It’s a bit of a mystery to me but according to the text Complementary and Alternative Veterinary Medicine, by Allen Schoen and Susan Wynn, it is “the insertion of very fine needles into specific predetermined points on the body to produce (a specific) physiological response”. There are over 1000 points of insertion and these are thought to be tied to different energy channels in the body. By opening these channels a desired affect can be achieved. The practice originated in Asia over 2,000 years ago. In addition to being a licensed veterinarian Dr. Scott was trained by the Chi Institute of Chinese Medicine and the China Society of Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine in Beijing, China. She has been practicing both acupuncture and holistic therapies at Triangle Veterinary Hospital for about 2 years. Most commonly she uses acupuncture in the treatment of arthritis, disc disease and back pain, organ dysfunction, behavior modification, asthma, and epilepsy.

    The Pattersons take Matilda to see Dr. Scott for acupuncture treatments about every two weeks. In addition to traditional acupuncture Matilda sometimes receives a specialized form of acupuncture treatment in which low voltage electro stimulation is used in conjunction with traditional needle insertion for an increased affect. So, how’s it working? Well according to the Pattersons, “It’s working great. Matilda is up and around better than ever and she loves Dr. Scott and her staff. The procedures aren’t painful at all. In fact Matilda enjoys her treatments and seems to look forward to then. We couldn’t be happier”, says Ms. Patterson. “In fact Matilda is brattier than ever!”

    For more information on the acupuncture and holistic services offered by Dr. Scott at Triangle Veterinary Hospital call 919-489-2391.

     
  18. Dogmatix

    Dogmatix New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Messages:
    644
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    The 13 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear Walter Moers
    aimg110.imageshack.us_img110_9755_dvmcp5.jpg

    I don’t want to offend anyone. Although I don’t own a gun or a bow and have never shot an animal I have plenty of respect for responsible firearm owners and hunters. My husband has a small rifle collection and a bow. Each year he hunts a single deer which we send to the butcher for processing. Usually my relatives fight over who got the sausage last year and whose turn it is to get the tenderloin. My grandmother’s beef stew never tastes as good as it does at the end of deer season.

    What boils my blood however, are the absolutely irresponsible fools that think the world is their shooting gallery and that the North Carolina Wildlife Resource Commission regulations don’t apply to them. I don’t really care what anyone’s particular opinion about hunting is, but the law is the law and we are all expected to abide by it.

    Last Wednesday a Good Samaritan brought a Canada goose to the hospital with an arrow in its chest. The arrow had pierce the bird’s right side, traveled through the chest cavity then pierced the bird’s left side before becoming firmly lodged. Dr. Pamela Cuevas DVM, the veterinarian on duty that day said, “I’ve never seen anything like it. The arrow was protruding almost symmetrically from either side of this poor bird”.

    Amazingly, the bird was alive and fairly stable when it arrived. “Of course heart and lung trauma were our main concerns,” she continued. After sedating the painful and terrified bird she took a series of X-rays to determine if any major organs were damaged and to help make a plan for the removal of the arrow. According to Dr. Cuevas, “The arrow just missed his heart.” After initial stabilization the arrow was carefully removed and antibiotics and pain medications were administered. “The goose recovered well from the surgery and was eating, preening his feathers and hissing at the staff by Thursday afternoon. He will need to stay on medications for a while”, said Dr. Cuevas. “Then we’ll need to transport him to a federally licensed rehabilitator to care for him. He’s still got a long way to go.”

    Canada geese have been a federally protected species since the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 which was drafted to protect many species of migrating birds, including the Canada goose. There are two basic populations of these beautiful birds; migratory geese, those that fly to Alaska and Canada annually and resident geese, those that live primarily in the same location all year round. Recently there has been a lot of controversy surrounding the rapidly growing resident Canada geese population. Resident geese can cause formidable damage to agricultural lands, waterways, and residential areas. They also cause hazardous takeoff and landing conditions at airports.

    On August 11, 2006 a news release was issued by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in direct response to these growing concerns. After almost 5 years of study and debate over the issue of resident Canada geese the federal government ruled to ease some regulations allowing state governments to institute programs specifically aimed at controlling the numbers of resident Canada geese while impacting migratory Canada geese as little as possible.

    Currently in North Carolina any shooting of Canada geese is subject to strict regulations and according to the 2006-2007 N.C. Inland Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Regulations Digest; “It is unlawful to hunt Canada geese without having federal Harvest Information Program Certification in addition to all applicable state and federal licenses.” There are harsh state and federal penalties for violating these regulations. The way the law is written a violation of a state regulation regarding these birds also constitutes a federal violation. In short, it’s a federal crime.

    So what about this particular goose? He’s doing well and will soon be released from the hospital. A federally licensed rehabilitator will keep him until he is completely healed and an appropriate location for his release can be located. In the meantime, if you have any information about who shot this Canada goose with an arrow please report it to the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission at 1-800-662-7137. A fully downloadable version of the final federal ruling is available at www.fws.gov.
     
  19. Dogmatix

    Dogmatix New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Messages:
    644
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    The 13 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear Walter Moers
    Not as thrilling as last week but here ya go:


    We all love our pets. They’re such important members of the family and they give us so much more than we can ever give them in return. For pet lovers a house isn’t a home without a least one furry member. This is never felt more keenly than when our pets go missing. If you’ve lost a pet then you know how devastating it can be; not knowing where your friend is, if he is hungry, injured, or worse. According to Avid Microchip Services a pet is lost in the United States every 2 seconds. This amounts to over a million pets per year. Once a pet is lost the statistics become very grim, with only the smallest percentage ever being reunited with their families.

    Of course we try to keep our pets safely confined with leashes, fences, or even inside our homes. Unfortunately even our most diligent efforts can fail. Pets can slip their leash, push through a loose window screen, or dig beneath the sturdiest of fences. Pets are often lost during a move or when friends and family come to visit. The holiday season, with all of its festivities is another time when many pets go missing. If your pet is lost its best defense is identification. I recommend multiple forms of identification for every pet.

    A collar with attached id tags is the absolute best tool you can use to get your pet back quickly and safely. Every pet that ever ventures outside should wear a collar with tags. The identification tag should state your pet’s name, your name, your address, and your telephone number. If size will allow your veterinarian’s phone number is also a great piece of information to include. This can be quite valuable should your pet be found sick or injured of if you can’t be reached.

    In addition to a tag, which may become dislodged, I recommend writing your telephone number directly on the collar in permanent marker. Finally, if your pet spends any time on a chain or runner then he should wear two collars; one that clips to the lead rope and one specifically for his identification.

    Although a collar and tag are readily visible they can be lost or removed so a second form of more permanent identification is also recommended. The most common permanent form of identification in use today is the microchip. A microchip is a tiny hypoallergenic chip that can be inserted under your pet’s skin. Insertion is performed at the veterinarian’s office. It’s fast and relatively painless.

    Microchips are read with hand held scanners and most shelters and veterinary hospitals have them. There are two major microchip manufacturers, Avid and Home Again. Recently, each began making scanners that will identify chips from either manufacturer. In this way no chipped animal will be missed. The information connected to your pet’s chip is stored in a database which can be updated with your current contact information for the life of your pet.

    Not as popular as it used to be tattooing is another excellent form of identification which combines permanence and visibility. Unfortunately, with the advent of microchips tattooing has fallen out of vogue. Tattoos can be placed any place on the body but are most often placed on the inner ear flap, or on the inner thigh. Even today all racing Greyhounds and Thoroughbred horses are tattooed to help prevent cheating and theft.

    Once your pet is lost identification is his one lifeline back home. Combining multiple forms of identification is the best way to ensure your pet is quickly identified and safely returned.
     
  20. Dogmatix

    Dogmatix New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Messages:
    644
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    The 13 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear Walter Moers
    I forgot to post last week so you're getting two for the price of one. Good deal especially since they're free;)

    It’s a Real Jungle at the Vet’s Office

    Like medical doctors veterinarians are constantly striving to increase their medical knowledge and improve their professional skill set. Every year there is new information to learn. It can be a real foot race for veterinarians to keep up. It’s not just new therapies and procedures that challenge us, vets also face the daunting task of learning about so many different species of animals, each with its own unique physiology and behavior. In their daily work vets treat many different types of animals; often after seeing a species close-up for the very first time. Although dogs and cats still make up the largest percentage of veterinary patients, more and more exotic pets are showing up in the exam rooms than ever before. From geckos to chinchillas, if it’s called a pet by someone there’s a veterinarian that’s had to figure out how to treat it.

    I’m reminded of a funny episode of Seinfeld in which George Costanza ran over a squirrel with his car. To impress his girlfriend he took it to a vet’s office, expecting humane euthanasia. The veterinarian told George they could fix the squirrel but would have to order “special little tiny instruments” to do it. I laughed at the show but last month one of my vets had me order a special set of dental tools for working on rabbit and chinchilla teeth. She’s the same vet that ordered a gram scale, for weighing baby birds, a humidifying lizard incubator, and a nebulizer - a machine that turns liquid medications into a mist that can be breathed in. It’s for treating rats and snakes with pneumonia. Some days my office looks more like a zoo!

    One especially daunting challenge all veterinarians face is treating treat sick and injured wildlife. Personally I enjoy working with wildlife when the chance arises. It’s always interesting and can be quite rewarding. Some of the many cases I remember over the last four years; a net tangled black snake, a blind screech owl, another owl with a broken pelvis, 3 deer that had been hit by cars, a wounded bat (which sadly I had to euthanize because of rabies concerns), a couple of red tail hawks, a nightingale with an injured wing, a finch stuck in a bird feeder, a few doves that had been attacked by cats, multiple possums, lions, tigers, a New Guinea Singing Dog, turtles with cracked shells and fish hooks in their throats, a squirrel with a head injury, another squirrel with a hernia, a huge buzzard with a broken bone, and many baby bunnies and birds. Just a couple of days ago I was lucky enough to see a tiny baby flying squirrel. That was a real treat!

    Treating wildlife however, isn’t always a success story. Unfortunately, a lot of wild animals are simply too sick to be saved, others are too stressed in a hospital setting to survive without extreme measures. Rabies concerns also restrict which animals can be treated and under what circumstances. Public health and safety always have to be our first concern. Well meaning citizen’s often will bring in “orphaned” baby birds and bunnies they’ve found which aren’t orphaned at all and whose parents are frantically looking for them. That can sometimes be a real tragedy.

    Although treating sick and injured wildlife can be difficult for veterinarians, it’s the wildlife rehabilitators that have the real challenge. These specially trained folks work around the clock, usually without pay to feed and care for hundreds of animals every year. What falls to them are the animals that aren’t ill enough to be hospitalized but aren’t well enough to be released. During spring and summer these folks feed baby birds every 15 minutes, nurse countless squirrels and bunnies and clean pounds of poop every day. Fortunately, we have several excellent rehabilitators in and around Alamance County that many veterinarians can rely on.

    Being a veterinarian is always an adventure. You never know when you’re going to see something you’ve never seen before. Nowadays, with all of the wild and exotic species veterinarians treat it can be a real jungle at the vet’s office!

    Hypertension Affects our Pets


    Every time I go to the doctor’s office for a check up I have my blood pressure checked. It really doesn’t matter why I’m there, she checks it every time. High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a serious medical condition and medical doctors are trained to screen for it every chance they get. Last week one of my clients asked me why we don’t check her dog’s blood pressure when he comes in for a check up. “Good question”, I said and probably one that many of you would like the answer to. So here’s a little primer on high blood pressure and your pets.

    In humans, high blood pressure is frequently a stand alone diagnosis. This means that you can have high blood pressure with no other contributing disease. This is called Primary Hypertension and it’s a serious medical condition. Our pets can also have high blood pressure but it’s most often Secondary Hypertension. This means that another underlying disease is present and is causing your pet’s blood pressure to rise. Pets can have Primary Hypertension but it’s a much less common condition.

    There are several systemic illnesses that can lead to high blood pressure in our pets. Some of the most common include; kidney disease, diabetes, hyperthyroidism (over active thyroid function), Cushing’s syndrome (excessive cortisol production), and some forms of heart disease. If your pet has any of these conditions your veterinarian may monitor your pet’s blood pressure regularly. It’s known that senior pets, those over seven years of age, are also more likely to develop hypertension. Most veterinarians that have a Senior Care Program include routine blood pressure testing as part of their bi-annual senior exam.

    If high blood pressure is present pets are at an increased risk for damage to the vascular system, particularly the smaller vessels which carry nutrients and oxygen directly to hungry tissues. Damage or rupture of these small vessels eventually leads to damage of the organs which they supply. The kidneys in particular are exceptionally sensitive to high blood pressure. Ironically, kidney disease often leads to high blood pressure, which in turn further damages the kidneys. The eyes can also be damaged by high blood pressure. At the back of the eye is the retina with its tiny retinal vessels providing nutrients and oxygen to the eye. With hypertension these retinal vessels can rupture, causing detachment of the retina and vision loss. A special lens is used to check the back of the eye and the retinal vessels, whenever high blood pressure is suspected.

    Blood pressure measurement in pets is a bit more complicated than in humans and requires special instrumentation. Veterinarians most often use an amplifier, called a Doppler, which is placed on the skin over an artery in the tail or the leg to make pulse sounds louder and aid in blood pressure measurement. Sometimes they will use a special mechanical system that not only measures systolic and diastolic pressures, the measurements your doctor reads to you at your check-up, but also calculates the mean arteriole pressure (basically the average blood pressure over a complete cycle). Both systems employ the use of a blood pressure cuff, just like the one your doctor uses.

    When hypertension is suspected other diseases must be screened for and treated. If no other disease can be found, or if treating one fails to correct high blood pressure, medication will often be prescribed. Veterinarians use low doses of anti hypertension medications developed for treating human high blood pressure. These medications are given for life. If your pet has any of the above mentioned diseases or is over 7 yeas of age, ask your veterinarian if you should have its blood pressure checked.
     

Share This Page