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The English words which taken from Arabic language

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by A.sweet, Dec 30, 2010.

  1. A.sweet

    A.sweet New Member

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    Hi readers
    This thread is about the English words which taken from Arabic language.
    Arabic: c.1500, from O.Fr. Arabic (13c.), from L. Arabicus "Arabic" (see Arab). Originally in ref. to gum arabic. Arabic numerals (actually Indian) first attested 1727; they were introduced in Europe by Gerbert of Aurillac (later Pope Sylvester II) after a visit to Islamic Spain in 967-970. A prominent man of science, he taught in the diocesan school at Reims, but the numbers made little headway against conservative opposition in the Church until after the Crusades. The earliest depiction of them in Eng., in "The Crafte of Nombrynge" (c.1350) correctly identifies them as "teen figurys of Inde."And ofcours Arabic is the language which The Qurran has downloaded.

    coffee c.1600, from It. caffe, from Turk. kahveh, from Arabic qahwah "coffee," said originally to have meant "wine," but perhaps rather from Kaffa region of Ethiopia, a home of the plant (coffee in Kaffa is called buno, which was borrowed into Arabic as bunn "raw coffee"). Much initial diversity of spelling, including chaoua. Yemen was the first great coffee exporter and to protect its trade decreed that no living plant could leave the country. In 16c., a Muslim pilgrim brought some coffee beans from Yemen and raised them in India. Appeared in Europe (from Arabia) c.1515-1519. Introduced to England by 1650, and by 1675 the country had more than 3,000 coffee houses. Coffee plantations established in Brazil 1727. Meaning "a light meal at which coffee is served" is from 1774. Coffee break attested from 1940s. Coffee pot from 1705.

    mocha
    1733, from Mocha, Red Sea port of Yemen, from which coffee was exported. Meaning "mixture of coffee and chocolate" first recorded 1849. As a shade of dark brown, it is attested from 1895
    PS:Yemen is an arab country, in the arabian Peninsula.guitar
    1620s, ultimately from Gk. kithara "cithara," a stringed musical instrument related to the lyre, perhaps from Pers. sihtar (see sitar); the name reached English several times, including early 14c. giterne, in reference to various stringed, guitar-like instruments; the modern word is directly from Sp. guittara, from Arabic qitar, from the Greek.

    banana
    1590s, borrowed by Spanish or Portuguese from a W. African word, possibly Wolof banana. The plant introduced to the New World from Africa, 1516. Top banana, second banana, etc. are 1950s, from show business slang use of banana for "comedian, especially in a burlesque show." Banana split first attested 1920. Banana oil "nonsense" is slang from c.1910.
    PS:African people in the texet means the arab people who has lived in Africa.lemon
    type of citrus fruit, c.1400, from O.Fr. limon "citrus fruit," from O.Prov., from Arabic laimun, from Pers. limu(n), generic terms for citrus fruits (compare lime); cognate with Skt. nimbu "the lime." Slang meaning "a Quaalude" is 1960s, from Lemmon, name of a pharmaceutical company that once manufactured the drug.

    massage
    1876, from Fr. massage "friction of kneading," from masser "to massage," possibly from Arabic massa "to touch, feel, handle;" if so, probably picked up in Egypt during the Napoleonic campaign there. Other possibility is that Fr. got it in colonial India from Port. amassar "knead," a verb from L. massa "mass, dough" (see mass (1)). The verb is attested from 1887. Massage parlor first attested 1913, from the start a euphemism for "house of prostitution."

    algebra
    1550s, from M.L. algebra, from Arabic al jebr "reunion of broken parts," as in computation, used 9c. by Baghdad mathematician Abu Ja'far Muhammad ibn Musa al-Khwarizmi as the title of his famous treatise on equations ("Kitab al-Jabr w'al-Muqabala" "Rules of Reintegration and Reduction"), which also introduced Arabic numerals to the West. The accent shifted 17c. from second syllable to first. The word was used in English 15c.-16c. to mean "bone-setting," probably from Arab medical men in Spain.

    sofa
    1620s, "raised section of a floor, covered with carpets and cushions," from Turk. sofa, from Arabic suffah "bench." Meaning "long stuffed seat for reclining" is recorded from 1717.
     
  2. Peder

    Peder Well-Known Member

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    Interesting.

    I thought "algorithm" also, from the Musa al-Khwarizmi whom you mentioned.
     
  3. beer good

    beer good Well-Known Member

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    Currently Reading:
    "NW", Smith
    And alcohol, of course.
     
  4. A.sweet

    A.sweet New Member

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    Oh, really :0.I am interested in thise to, and so proud of my language "Arabic"^_^.
    And thanks peder and beer good^_^.
     

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