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What do you think of the prices of new books?

Will

Active Member
My publisher is pushing me to write for kindle type readers, because it costs them less than the traditional binding and distribution methods. I write limited edition mysteries and the field is very competitive. Although, I am not going to tout my books here, I do want to say, that my publisher has gone away from hard covered books, because the cost of printing is getting more expensive with every printing, plus with soft covered pulp fiction books, they can pay less to authors, because there is a lot of writers out there. :)

I understand a huge appeal of limited edition press copies is that they are 'limited edition', sometimes slip-cased/limited runs and such, and that much of the appeal lay in that aesthetic of their design/make-up/scarcity. Surely by going digital aren't you removing much of that appeal?

I know of several small horror publishers going digital for similar reasons of cost, but there's also the fact that they were only able to become perceived as traditional publishers due to the fact they producted hard-copy books despite these having small print runs/low costs etc.

I wonder whether such books will see comparative sales of digital copies vs. traditional print media. I also wonder whether we're ultimately just going to see lots of smaller publishing houses appear who are knocking out copies by certain authors who wouldn't have been published otherwise, eventually leading to people turning more to the traditional publishing houses for assurances of quality etc.
 

Bluenote

Member
I'd rather pay $10 or $15 for a hardback book than the same price for an eBook.

But I still buy CDs too.



I've been complaining since paperbacks went past the dollar mark and hardbacks the ten dollar mark.

But then having been in the production end of the trade I know what it costs to produce even paperbacks. And E-Books...........I don't do E-books , give me something with pages I can turn physically , thank you very much.

And others of us still purchase CDs , in point of fact some of us still own ,play and purchase vinyl ( when it can still be found) , there's a lot of stuff that never made it to cd.
 

Bluenote

Member
Okay, so the title of this reply is lame, but the price, that is paid, at a bookstore, is not the amount that the originator (author) receives, which is a lot less. The bookstore takes some, the publisher takes some, the author that sweated over each and every word gets a little. My publisher is pushing me to write for kindle type readers, because it costs them less than the traditional binding and distribution methods. I write limited edition mysteries and the field is very competitive. Although, I am not going to tout my books here, I do want to say, that my publisher has gone away from hard covered books, because the cost of printing is getting more expensive with every printing, plus with soft covered pulp fiction books, they can pay less to authors, because there is a lot of writers out there. I believe my publish discounts their books to the big chains by as much as 60% and, as a result, works on less money coming in based on a shortened length of time that the book is displayed and sold (about a month, if we are lucky, unless a major book signing, which only happens if you have a tie in with some other venue, such as an upcoming movie or TV show, such as Castle). So, if you are paying under $30.00 for a book, first, let me thank you, if it was one of mine, you are not paying to much. If you are paying $15.97 or less, smile you are getting a good deal. If you are paying $10.00 or less, you just paid me 80 cents. Ouch :)



Exactly. And to extend it a bit further examine just the cost of flooring the equipment to produce a printed volume , start with just the press , something that will place you in the market in a competitive production position is a *minimum* 4 million dollar and up , mostly UP investment..........used , we won't even talk new. Add a dedicated 2/c or 4/c sheetfed for covers in 34" to 40" format , high-speed and DTP of course , another .5 to 1 million , 250 thousand for a typesetting ( nowadays composing) system , and then of course all the ancillary support equipment i.e. cutters , bindery equipment ( sending all hardback binding out of course) and the industrial space to floor it all.

Costs add up , and the money isn't being made by the production facilities ( except for the HUGE majors) and the folks working in them , nor by many of the authors , there's a huge chunk going to agents ,publishing houses amd distributors.

I toyed with the idea of opening a small production facility at sheetfed levels , but even then the investment is significant seven figures and you're in competition with offshore houses that can do it much cheaper.
 

Keira

New Member
I consider that a lot especially for people like myself who are still studying and haven't found a job just yet. Imagine how much you would have spent in a month if let's say I'm into full reading gear finishing 4 books in total. That would easily amount to $100.
 

The Butcher

New Member
Too freaking much. I saw a copy of Dexter is Delicious on opening day.

This book series is very underground, and the the hardcover was 25-28$, that is just way too much for a underground series. Softback are perfectly priced though.

The less the book cost,the more chance people will buy it.
 

readsalot

Member
Yikes $25.00... go get stuff at amazon... usually a good discount... even if you knock off $5.00 will be helpful
 
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