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You've just gotta see it...

Miss Shelf

New Member
No photos but recently I've driven past a couple of restaurants that had on their signs: 1) Try our Cheesey Burgers" and 2) "Try our new fisch sandwich!". How can anyone misspell fish??
 

steffee

Active Member
Miss Shelf said:
No photos but recently I've driven past a couple of restaurants that had on their signs: 1) Try our Cheesey Burgers" and 2) "Try out new fisch sandwich!". How can anyone misspell fish??

Jeez, and I complain when I see "bannana"!! :eek: :eek:

The quickest way to turn away potential customers :(
 

Miss Shelf

New Member
steffee said:
Jeez, and I complain when I see "bannana"!! :eek: :eek:

The quickest way to turn away potential customers :(

I know-I don't think I want to eat in a place that gives the impression it's run by illiterates-how do you know they know how to cook food that won't give you food poisoning? Maybe it's a ploy to ensnare people who take the time to stop in and point out the mistake? (not that I would do that...:eek: )
 

bren

Member
Misspell fish?

The guy that wrote the Lexicon of Musical Invective, whose name escapes me, had a favorite spelling for fish. It was "ghoti." The lexicon was kind of funny and informative, but the index was truly hilarious. Such listings as, "cats, caterwauling of," lots of cat entries on all that twentieth century music!:D English was not his first language, and he enjoyed the many moods of english pronunciation, apparently.
 

actonbell

New Member
I hate seeing "15 items or less" lanes at the supermarket. It's my biggest fear that that will become acceptable English.
And I used to pass a sign every day that said, "tattoos in rear."

Helping kids read gooder? That's a find, indeed! We can only hope it was in jest.
 

steffee

Active Member
It should be fewer.

Less is when you can't count it, like less space.

Fewer is when you can count it, like fewer potatoes.
 

Miss Shelf

New Member
I always thought "or less" is OK for grocery lanes. Not everyone can understand "15 items or fewer". :rolleyes: It reminds me of the debate over "different from" and "different than".

Actually, I think it's nit-picking. I prefer to save my indignation for more blatant misspellings (the "fisch" sign is still up, and it's at a local KFC) and other manglings of the language.

That sign is an eye-catching publicity stunt. However, it leaves people with the impression that Hooked on Phonics will miseducate their kids.

Photoshopped=digitally altered photos.
 

steffee

Active Member
Thanks for the photoshopped definition :)

Yeah I agree too, about the fewer / less one. I think "15 items or less" sounds ok, and it's commonplace now anyway.

There's certain errors, that I can't stand, such as:

their / there / they're
knew / new
discrete / discreet
taught / learnt

etc.

I don't even know the differences between "different from" and "different than" :confused:
 

Miss Shelf

New Member
what gets me to grind my teeth are "mantel/mantle" (as in 'she put on her mantel'), "pedal/peddle" ('he was peddling his bicycle'), and "bridal/bridle" (often misused with 'bridle path') :mad:
 

steffee

Active Member
Miss Shelf said:
what gets me to grind my teeth are "mantel/mantle" (as in 'she put on her mantel'), "pedal/peddle" ('he was peddling his bicycle'), and "bridal/bridle" (often misused with 'bridle path') :mad:

LOL at the bridal/bridle one. I haven't even heard of a mantel, and I suppose the peddle one could be a bit ambiguous, seeing as one could maybe peddle on their bicycle. :D

I guess it's the same with principle and principal.
 

Miss Shelf

New Member
I wonder why it is that some people just can't get those differences? It kind of ruins things for me in books when there are those typos. I wonder if book editors nowadays are running things through computer spell checkers instead of doing it themselves?
 

angerball

Active Member
steffee said:
Thanks for the photoshopped definition :)

There's certain errors, that I can't stand, such as:

their / there / they're
knew / new
discrete / discreet
taught / learnt

I can't stand when people confuse "then" and "than". How can you confuse them - they are completely different?! :mad:
 

bren

Member
Of course they are! The only other explanation would be that they themselves don't know the difference and that simply cannot be. :rolleyes:
(This is in reference to the spellcheck comment.)
 
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