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1 in 4 Americans don't read-CNN article

Discussion in 'General Book Discussion' started by SFG75, Aug 21, 2007.

  1. BeerWench13

    BeerWench13 Active Member

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    Though I understand your meaning, there are some very educational channels and programs on TV. My husband, for instance, doesn't read, but you will find him watching The Discovery Channel, The History Channel, The Science Channel, The Learning Channel and Animal Planet all of the time. He just doesn't have the patience to read about these things.

    He seems to gain a better understanding by watching documentaries and programs than he would ever glean from reading a book. TV is not evil and not all of the programming is mind-numbing fluff.
     
  2. Hollywood24

    Hollywood24 New Member

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    I read in an article that Detroit is America's book city. Aparently they read the most books per capita then any other city.

    I think its cause their all scared to go outside :D
     
  3. unKeMPt

    unKeMPt New Member

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    There are a number of reasons to be wary of surveys, but this is not one of them. Populations tend follow something called a bell curve; that means two-thirds of the population fall within one standard deviation of the mean, 95% fall within two standard deviations, and 99.9% fall within three standard deviations. If subjects are randomly chosen from the population, as they were with this one, that means we should see results that approximate the actual population.

    For example, if you ask one hundred people, you should expect roughly 67 to fall within one standard deviation, 95 within two, and all within three. By controlling the confidence level, one can adjust the margins of error: We can be 90% confident that all surveys taken would show results within a certain margin of error, or be 95% confident that all surveys taken would show results within a larger margin or error (thus the greater confidence in the results.) And, actually, asking any more people beyond 600 or so reduces the standard error so negligably that it's rather pointless to find more people to ask.
     

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