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Books you were forced to read at school!

Discussion in 'General Book Discussion' started by headpodd, Dec 7, 2003.

  1. Martin

    Martin Active Member

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    Currently Reading:
    The Fry Chronicles
    I've alwas liked Shakespeare, though.

    Cheers, Martin :D
     
  2. Idun

    Idun Member

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    I could give you an awfully long list, but, due to the fact that our school systems concentrates mainly on familiarizing students with Polish books/poems (and I'm too lazy to look for their English titles in the Net, sorry:p ), here are some examples of foreign works, which we had to read.

    Master and Margarita
    Crime and Punishment
    Antigone
    Tristan and Isolda
    Macbeth
    Hamlet
    The Sorrows of Young Werther
    Giaour
    Lord Jim
    Animal Farm
    1984
    Papa Goriot
    Little Prince
    Earth of People- A. de Saint Exupery
    Old man and the Sea
    The Plaque
    Perfume - the Story of a Murderer
    The Trial
    Tartuffe

    It's not very similar to any of your lists, I'm afraid. I wonder why.
     
  3. Nemo

    Nemo New Member

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    Of that last list, in the U.S. we read:
    Antigone
    macbeth
    Hamlet
    Animal Farm
    Old Man and the Sea
    The Trial.

    Plus, for our senior year's paper, people read:
    Tartuffe
    Little Prince
    1984
    The Sorrows of Young Werther
    Crime and Punishment
     
  4. Nemo

    Nemo New Member

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    In addition, we read in our senior year alone:
    madame bovary
    a doll's house
    Mrs. warren's profession
    the trial
    dante's inferno
    hamlet
    medea

    and others that I just can not remember
     
  5. Idun

    Idun Member

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    Currently Reading:
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    Here some similarity really can be noticed. Thank you for having shown it, Nemo.:D
     
  6. Jezebel

    Jezebel New Member

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    Of Mice and Men
    Romeo and Juliet
    The Crucible
    The Odyssey
    Beowulf
    Macbeth
    Brave New World
    A Midsummer Night Dream
    Much Ado About Nothing
    Othello

    we're reading King Lear next...
     
  7. SHorn

    SHorn New Member

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    Currently Reading:
    The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
    This is from 6th to 12th grade.

    The Odyssey
    The Crucible
    Antigone
    Cyrano de Bergerac
    Frankenstein
    Beowulf
    The Great Gatsby
    The Giver
    Hamlet
    Where the Red Fern Grows
    Anthem
    Macbeth
    Brave New World
    A Lesson Before Dying
    Catcher in the Rye
    To Kill a Mockingbird
    Romeo and Juliet
    The Joy Luck Club
    Great Expectations

    I believe I've got them all. :)
     
  8. David181173

    David181173 New Member

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    Currently Reading:
    "That Which Was" by Glenn Patterson
    Haethurn,

    I hope you wont take this the wrong way, but this seems a very simplistic conclusion. It seems as blinkered as the sort of teacher you criticise. Just as there are more gradations of morality than just good and bad, or black and white, there are surely more than just two types of teacher. Its a shame that one teacher, or perhaps several similar teachers, have clearly made you so angry.

    For my own part, I enjoyed both Mockingbird and LotF at school. I was lucky to have teachers who inspired me and a selection of books that I happeneded to take to. Had I been force fed D. H. Lawrence or Catch 22 I might have been put off literature for life!

    I'm not a great fan of swear words believing they are all to often an excuse for lazy language. However, for direct speech to be realistic they sadly need to be there.
     
  9. chocolatclari

    chocolatclari New Member

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    I'm in the 8th grade and I remember we had to read "The Yearling" and "Huckleberry Finn" last year. FUUUUN...

    -Maria
     
  10. wkdblueeyes

    wkdblueeyes New Member

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    I remember these books from school.

    Shane
    Of Mice and Men
    Billy Liar
    The Pearl (I think that's what it was called, all I remember is it was about a Meixican - again not too sure - who found a pearl and ended up blowing his babys' head off!!!!)
    Diary of Anne Frank - this moved the whole class to tears

    I really hated being "forced" to read at school. Would rather have read one of my own books. I probably would have enjoyed my English class better had this been the case. :rolleyes:
     
  11. Beatrycze

    Beatrycze New Member

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    We had also fragments of "Lolita" by Nabokow- I read the whole. And we knew the first sentence in English to savour his language.
     
  12. evil_kenshin

    evil_kenshin New Member

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    so far
    -romeo and juliet
    - lockie lenard
    -tommorow when the war began
    - the red king
    - deadly unna

    out of them i only like tommorow when the war began and the red king
     
  13. Mike Feury

    Mike Feury kickbox

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    This incomplete list is from 1966-72 in Ireland (national curriculum):

    Hamlet
    Macbeth
    Julius Caesar
    Romeo and Juliet
    Murder in the Cathedral
    Arms and the Man
    Oedipus Rex
    Short stories of Frank O'Connor
    Gulliver's Travels
    Lord of the Flies
    Lord Jim
    The Shrimp and the Anemone
    The Pearl
    Hard Times
    The Mayor of Casterbridge
    Huckleberry Finn
    The Great Gatsby
    1984
    Animal Farm
    The Odyssey

    Various books in other languages too, plus a raft of poetry.
     
  14. Robinson Crusoe

    Robinson Crusoe New Member

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    Haethurn, "Hate"? Do you really 'Hate'? Is there an empty seat available for me? Can you register for both classes and benefit from the good portions of both approaches to teaching? More and more we come into contact with people of diverse qualities. That is a result of our freedom to be ourselves. How far along are you in the class?---Robinson Crusoe---
     
  15. David181173

    David181173 New Member

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    Currently Reading:
    "That Which Was" by Glenn Patterson
    Books/plays studied for GCSE included:
    Macbeth
    Romeo and Juliet
    Lord of the Flies
    To Kill A Mockingbird
    My Family and Other Animals

    No Dickens, but I've since read all his major novels. The only one I've never been able to finish is Pickwick - a favourite for some other Dickens fans.

    A level syllabus included:
    Keats' Odes
    Henry IV Part I
    King Lear
    Jane Eyre
    Pride and Prejudice
    Far from the Madding Crowd

    The A level book I most loathed was "The Great Gatsby". Perhaps in part because I was a bit of a moral fundamentalist as a sixth former. I believed all great literature promoted good behaviour. The amoral characters of Gatsby's world didn't fit.

    I notice Hardy got a few mentions earlier in this topic, so I've started a thread on him in the author discussion section:
    http://forums.thebookforum.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=1337
     
  16. Beery

    Beery New Member

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    Books I had to read and hated:

    Animal Farm
    Of Mice and Men
    Shane
    Lord of the Flies

    Books I had to read and loved:

    The Golden Apples of the Sun by Ray Bradbury

    So Ray Bradbury saved me from hating every book I read in High School. Thanks Ray! :)

    Oh, and George Orwell, I don't care how many teachers think you're a brilliant writer, I still think you SUCK!
     
  17. David181173

    David181173 New Member

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    Currently Reading:
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    This thread raises the question of whether books are ruined by being studied academically? Is it possible to over-analyse books? The answer to both questions is probably, "sometimes, yes".

    I asked one of my A level English teachers whether part of what we were aiming to do was to discover exactly what the author intended. As far as I can recall, she said it was legitimate to read in things that may never have consciously occurred to the author, not least because subconsciously this may have been something they were implying. This answer may be explained in part by the fact that the teacher in question was actually a university lecturer who was only working in the school part time. An academic would give this sort of answer, because there is a whole academic industry based on uncovering the true meaning of classic literature. Many academics are convinced - or convince themselves - that the likes of Jane Austen wrote novels crammed with subtely disguised representations of sex and liberation. Or perhaps it is their publishers who convince them?

    For my own part, I actually find studying Shakespeare more fun than just watching it, even though it was intended for the stage more than the page. Once I've studied it I have a better idea what it is about.
     
  18. headpodd

    headpodd New Member

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    I absolutely think you can ruin a good book by over-analysis. I remember sitting in A-level English Lit. listening to the teacher going on about what the author REALLY meant and thinking "How do you know what the author really meant?". I sure all we ended up doing was critiquing not the books but others' interpretations of the books.

    It doesn't help you enjoy the books either if you know you've got some really scary exam about it afterwards. And the fact that you have to reread the books over and over again just so it sticks in your mind. You just end up hating everything about the books you were studying.

    Let's just say that I have never read another book by the same authors that I studied at A-level. Think that says it all really.
     
  19. Creator03

    Creator03 New Member

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    1)The Great Gatsby
    Thats all...
    :)
     
  20. Ashlea

    Ashlea New Member

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    Currently Reading:
    Princes of Ireland, Edward Rutherfurd
    The whole over-analysis issue is why I avoided grad school. I feel that my undergrad degree in English is really a degree in b.s., because in class all we would do was pick some positiion on our interpretation of a work, and the rest of the class would argue it. To keep the discussion going, you often end up playing devil's advocate even if you've been convinced that you're wrong. Actually developed skills that were useful in real life, but still . . . not signing up for another helping.
     

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