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Current Non-Fiction reads

Cosimah2o

Active Member
A cover for me,please Cosimah2o.
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La Paléobotanique et l'évolution du monde végétal : quelques problèmes d'actualité / Palaeobotany and evolution of the plant's world : some current problems - Académie des Sciences (( Paris ))
 
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readsalot

Member
The most recent Non-fic book I read was called Killing for Sport...about serial killers. It was okay, but I didn't learn anything I didn't already know from other books.
 

SFG75

Well-Known Member
Just finished Neil Sheehan's A bright shining lie. This book is about a man named John Paul Vann who went to Vietnam as a military advisor, and later on, as a civilian advisor. Sheehan was a part of a press corps that included Peter Arnett and David Halberstam. Vann provides insight to the press about the inner workings of the war and how the ARVN forces were not engaging in battle, how the Saigon regime engaged in corruption, as well as how the war became hopelessly lost. Vann risked his life numerous times and the accounts are absolutely amazing. After surviving ambushes, helicopter crashes, and mortar shelling, Vann ends up passing away in a non-combat related helicopter crash due to an amateur pilot navigating tough terrain at low altitude. What is fascinating is how Vann had contact with everyone from Nixon, to Daniel Ellsberg, to Halberstam and certain prominent generals of both America and South Vietnam. If you want a good book about why the war was "lost," this one would be it.

A somewhat dated interview that will give you a good overview of the book.

 

Cosimah2o

Active Member
IRIDESCENCES : Les Couleurs Physiques des Insectes - Serge Berthier .
Photonique des Morphos - Serge Berthier .

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direstraits

Well-Known Member
Now reading Getting Things Done, by David Allen. Very interesting. I also just got Genghis Khan, by Jack Weatherford (from Audible).
 

SFG75

Well-Known Member
Now reading Getting Things Done, by David Allen. Very interesting. I also just got Genghis Khan, by Jack Weatherford (from Audible).

I also have Getting Things Done! I've only read the prologue. I like the premise of the book and agree that the nature of work has fundamentally changed to such a degree, that simply getting a planner isn't going to cut it. The hardest thing for me, is to advance more than one item across the board. Doing so means leaving a lot of things 'half-done' and that just drives me nuts. Add on to that things that require your attention NOW and supersede what you're planning on completing.
 

direstraits

Well-Known Member
I also have Getting Things Done! I've only read the prologue. I like the premise of the book and agree that the nature of work has fundamentally changed to such a degree, that simply getting a planner isn't going to cut it. The hardest thing for me, is to advance more than one item across the board. Doing so means leaving a lot of things 'half-done' and that just drives me nuts. Add on to that things that require your attention NOW and supersede what you're planning on completing.
SFG, I'm more than halfway through the book now, and I can say it does suggest some pretty good tips to getting at least some part of your life organized. I would recommend you to read it - it's not a demanding read (beyond your time, I mean), and I always think it's a good idea to learn some helpful tips. :)
 

SFG75

Well-Known Member
Just finished Roosevelt and Pearl Harbor by Leonard Baker. Each chapter is dedicated to a month of 1941 and documents the march to war and how Roosevelt managed a balancing act between helping England and pacifying the pacifists at home who wanted to lied down stupidly in front of aggression. Add to that, Japan's increasing bellicose stance towards the U.S. and how Roosevelt attempted to beef up the military in the face of bureaucratic incompetence, and Roosevelt as the author maintains, was the best man for the job at the time. The book is impressive as many of that era, fail to document the change of leadership within the imperial forces of Japan that accelerated the march to war. Baker's book does a great job of highlighting how this occurred and what diplomatic occurred up until december. This book puts you at the tables of conversation between various leaders and cabinet officials. Definitely a winner.
 

KarlaH

New Member


If you're into this sort of thing...not sure how seriously to take some of these theories but definitely entertaining.
 

Cosimah2o

Active Member
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ChaosTheory

Active Member
Just started American Lion by Jon Meachem. Andrew Jackson was a fascinating person...an awful person in some ways, but fascinating.
 

pope36

New Member
7 Days to Live
by Nick Yarris

An amazing true story of how a man survived 21 years on death row for a crime he didn't commit.

namaste x
 

pope36

New Member
Its stories like this that add to the argument against the death penalty.

The best thing I like about this man, is his efforts to travel around schools and colleges as an example of what his education did for him on death row. His story put a whole different perspective on my life, as he has gone through all the worst things I can imagine, so all of my problems seemed minor in comparison. A true inspiration!!
 
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