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Fictional best friend

Well, I'm taking this from one of those 'Legacy of the Big Read' booklets.

If you could choose any character from a book or comic to hang out with, who would you choose and why?
 

ControlArmsNow

New Member
I'd like to "GO and rock and be flipped on Saturday night in the shack" with Sal Paradise and Dean Moriarty, and the others from On the Road, then on to Doc's party with Mack and the boys, where we'd meet up with the girls from Dora's Flophouse (Cannery Row). (Although if my wife asks I've spent a pleasant evening playing chess, drinking tea and discussing philosophy with that nice Mr Knox (Sophie's World) ;) ).
 

Ashlea

New Member
I'd like to have a conversation with Jane Eyre or Elizabeth Bennett, and I'd like a tour of London Below with Door (from Neverwhere.)
 

dele

New Member
Poirot. I can't think of too many things more exciting that being able to tag along and watch him solve a case.
 

Wabbit

New Member
HMMMMMMMMMMM that's a really tough choice. Guess I would choose somebody from a fantasy novel and have them show me around their world. Maybe Aslan from Narnia :)
 

funes

New Member
Very interesting. I am afraid I'm going to have to fudge a little and break things up.
Favorite character to have dinner with (male): Nero Wolfe
Ditto (female): Lena (from Conrad's Victory)
Favorite character to hang out with: Sal Paradise (though more from the Desolation Angels period)
I'm sure there are others, but you get the idea.
 

Crystal

kickbox
fluffy bunny said:
Well, I'm taking this from one of those 'Legacy of the Big Read' booklets.

If you could choose any character from a book or comic to hang out with, who would you choose and why?

*thumb up*

of course there are many, seriously. but the first fictional person came to me was Natasha (War and Peace) , then followed by Prince Bolkonsky. ( Sorry, I seemed to have been too obessessed about those two. :( )
 

Izzy

New Member
I'd like to meet in the Oxford Bar (a real pub in Edinburgh) with Inspector John Rebus. He's my kind of man :D
 

True@1stLight

New Member
Lady Brett Ashley from The Sun Also Rises .....yowza ;)

If it's for the conversation, then Porfiry Petrovich comes to mind from Crime and Punishment
 

True@1stLight

New Member
watercrystal said:
*thumb up*

of course there are many, seriously. but the first fictional person came to me was Natasha (War and Peace) , then followed by Prince Bolkonsky. ( Sorry, I seemed to have been too obessessed about those two. :( )

If I ever met Natasha I would throw her on the corner like the unfaithful wench that she is! :mad:

The Prince and I would get along quite well though....I would enjoy that meeting :)
 

Crystal

kickbox
more about Natasha

in case some one would like to read this:

Resource: Cliffsnote.com

Natasha is Tolstoy’s ideal woman. Attractive and bewitching as a child, her expressiveness and spontaneity are the natural outpourings of a creature imbued with life forces. She is compassionate, intense, with a soul responsive to music and dance, Tolstoyan symbols of her emotional spontaneity, and every moment of her being manifests the qualities of “instinctive life.” Tolstoy equates her with springtime, Andrey’s “renascence,” Nikolay’s affirmation of the “intensity of life” after his humiliation from Dolohov, and she is, as well, the agency of love for her bereaved mother and the reconciler of family quarrels.

Vehemently opposed to women being sexual objects, Tolstoy sees the feminine destiny entirely constrained within the limits of childrearing and familial harmony. Sexuality for Tolstoy must be directed toward its natural end of reproduction, else it is decadent and destructive. His own passionate nature attesting to sensual temptations, Tolstoy believed the only “safe” women were those who sublimated their seductiveness into the natural cares of womanhood. Thus Natasha is her author’s example of a successful woman: As she grows stout with child-bearing, she directs her enthusiasm and affectionateness toward her household responsibilities. Her femininity is no longer an empty gesture as in the days of Anatole, but now is participant in the biological continuity of life


and something about Prince Andrey Bolkonsky

Like his father, Andrey is the “best of his generation,” but is also a product of it. He sees how the rigid standards of his autocratic father isolate the old prince from his closest relations and how he suffers in a world of his own making. From this, the sensitive Andrey concludes that suffering and death are not as terrible as the power that allows people to inflict it, a conclusion that implicitly turns him away from life to seek perfection in death. To overcome the emotional anguish of these observations about his father, Andrey has developed a cold, intellectual approach to life which, by defining experience, also limits it. With his reason constantly pointing out to him the futility of his own life and the lives of those around him, his basic moral values are negative ones. Andrey’s career thus becomes a quest to rid his civilized self of the burden of isolation his intellect imposes upon him, just as his father is isolated by the burden of rigid class values.
Primarily seeking a career in which to forget himself, Andrey joins the army, becomes disillusioned with the futility of warfare, and, reaffirmed in his nihilism, retires from active life. Through Natasha, however, Andrey renews his life-commitment, for love promises him the possibility of an ego-dissolving relationship. Her frailty proves to him the imperfection and futility of all the activities of life and impels him to seek perfection in death.
Death, for Andrey, is not so much the final affirmation of life, as it is the cessation of being an individual. In death he discovers the release from his possessive egotism, an ultimate reassertion of the natural order where the creature is valueless save as an element in the infinite physical process
 
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