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J.K. Rowling set to write "crime" novel

beer good

Well-Known Member
It's the law. I can even make up words.

Well, scryx fneeble ponnotion, obviously. But if one wants to be understood, it's generally a good idea to try and use words we all have the same definition of. And some of us think debating semantics is fun. No hard feelings. ;)

(And yes, I ended a sentence on "of". I can do that.)
 

PhilW

New Member
And some parts of south central Kansas..but don't tell anyone;)

Kansas must be a scary place...all those drivers that can't read...not to mention the tornados. Do you own a pair of ruby slippers by any chance? (and we're back to ELO again, never mind L. Frank Baum!)

And I read your user name in the book that I have on the go at the moment too - woooo, getting spookier by the second! :eek:
 

abecedarian

Well-Known Member
Kansas must be a scary place...all those drivers that can't read...not to mention the tornados. Do you own a pair of ruby slippers by any chance? (and we're back to ELO again, never mind L. Frank Baum!)

And I read your user name in the book that I have on the go at the moment too - woooo, getting spookier by the second! :eek:


No ruby slippers, but I have an Aunt Dorothy, and a dd named Emily...the dog is named Daisy, so we're safe on that score. But if a scarecrow, tinman, or lion start singing and dancing, I'm outta here! I do accuse the produce guy at the local grocery store of stocking bananas that are refugees from the Emerald City..he just laughs.

BTW-What are you reading that has my name? Here I thought I was so original. I guess I should have had a clue when I discovered it in a dictionary more than 20 years ago..
 

PhilW

New Member
'Wife to Mr. Milton' by Robert Graves. They use the word in everyday speech (the novel is set in the 1640s). I have to confess, although I have seen your user name on here a lot, I never twigged that it was a real word or knew what it meant until now!
 

abecedarian

Well-Known Member
'Wife to Mr. Milton' by Robert Graves. They use the word in everyday speech (the novel is set in the 1640s). I have to confess, although I have seen your user name on here a lot, I never twigged that it was a real word or knew what it meant until now!

The reason I like the word so much is I love how closely related the pronunciation is to what the word means..and since I've taught all the kids to read, or am working on the ones who can't yet..I would have thought 'abecedarian' was just a made-up word if I hadn't seen the definition for myself.:p
 

sparkchaser

Administrator and Stuntman
Staff member
I spent a year in Kansas. Overland Park to be exact. Loved the city and everything it had to offer but hated the job so I came back to Virginia.
 

BeerWench13

Active Member
I am new to the forum, and must admit some trepidation in posting a remark regarding JK Rowling and/or the subject at hand "What is considered literature?"

Firstly, I have read all of the Harry Potter books with the exception of the last. I am currently about 1/3 of the way through the final book. I should be able to find time to finish it by the end of next week (work permitting, of course). I love these books. I do not tend to pick apart the books I read unless there is a lot of faulty editing, i.e. spelling and grammatical errors. They are good or they are not. The prose, character representation and basic plot are all a part of whether or not I find the book appealing.

The HP series is an easy read that is such a great escape from reality. That is the main reason I read fiction and the reason I am such a fan of the books. I did not decide to read them based on marketing or the hype that has surrounded them either. My 10-year-old niece drew my name at Christmas and bought The Order of the Phoenix for me. She said it was her favorite book and I promised that I would read it. I did and then had to go out as soon as I finished it and buy the others. I was an instant fan.

Are they comparable with The Iliad and The Odyssey? Not in my opinion. Will JKR ever vie with Shakespeare for solidarity throughout the centuries? Certainly not. Are the books entertaining? Very. Are they well written for easy reading? Absolutely.

Someone stated that defining literature is like defining art. I disagree. Literature is Art. You like it or you do not. It is a matter of personal taste. Not everyone likes Van Gogh, but most appreciate his talent because his works have lasted throughout the centuries. I believe that most literature is the same.

I do not know if JKR will do well as a crime novelist, but I am willing to give her a chance before forming an opinion. If the books are good I will read them. If they are not, I will find another that is more to my liking.
 

Shade

New Member
BeerWench13 said:
Someone stated that defining literature is like defining art. I disagree. Literature is Art. You like it or you do not. It is a matter of personal taste. Not everyone likes Van Gogh, but most appreciate his talent because his works have lasted throughout the centuries. I believe that most literature is the same.

A good point very well made.
 

Mrs Pacino

kickbox
I think that law only applies in England :D

To be fair, I think the law applies to all teachers of English on holiday.

During school time all we get is "How come you don't know what that word means/how to spell that, you're supposed to be an English teacher".

During the holidays we rebel and make up stuff. My own kids have an incredible vocabulary now, and nobody understands a word they say.
 

sparkchaser

Administrator and Stuntman
Staff member
My own kids have an incredible vocabulary now, and nobody understands a word they say.

I blame the accent.
icon_devillook.gif
 

abecedarian

Well-Known Member
To be fair, I think the law applies to all teachers of English on holiday.

During school time all we get is "How come you don't know what that word means/how to spell that, you're supposed to be an English teacher".

During the holidays we rebel and make up stuff. My own kids have an incredible vocabulary now, and nobody understands a word they say.


Do you mean to suggest that English teachers are not walking, talking dictionaries? :eek:

:D
 

Mrs Pacino

kickbox
It's probably just me who isn't.

I'm a pretty crappy English teacher to be fair. Mind you, the kids seem to like me so I'm not doing too badly.
 

Dharma

New Member
Do you mean to suggest that English teachers are not walking, talking dictionaries? :eek:

:D

Imagine being a translator... then you're definitely a walking dictionary. Oh, and it doesn't matter if you say you only translate from English to Portuguese... as soon as people hear the word "translator", they ask you for words in Spanish, Italian, German, you name it.

Dharma
 

abecedarian

Well-Known Member
Imagine being a translator... then you're definitely a walking dictionary. Oh, and it doesn't matter if you say you only translate from English to Portuguese... as soon as people hear the word "translator", they ask you for words in Spanish, Italian, German, you name it.

Dharma

Naturally-you're an expert right??;) I remember when I was little, and my uncle's bil brought around his fiance to meet the family. When I heard she was teacher, I started bombarding her with requests to write one word after another..I figured if she was a teacher, she must know 'everything!' Fortunately, she took it in stride, and married into the family anyway:D
 
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