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Paulo Coelho

Peder

Well-Known Member
corrections

Peder said:
Sabenankh,Actually it was "Acres of Diamonds" by Dale Carnegie, but I think you'll have a tough time finding it today. It goes back a bit, to his day, originally maybe in the '30s.
Peder
Sabenankh,
I see I should have checked amazon before I posted the above. :eek:
I now see that the author was Russell Conwell, not Dale Carnegie. :eek:
And I now see that it is readily available, alone or in collections. :eek:
But at least the title is still Acres of Diamonds. (Now I only hope that the story is as I remember it. :rolleyes: It sure seems like the right book, appearing in the company of another old-time inspirational book by Napoleon Hill, "Think And Grow Rich.")

So, maybe it is buyer beware!
Unfortunately, my copy is buried, otherwise I would know for sure.
/egg all over face/
Peder
 

Sabenankh

New Member
Hello Peder and sorry for this late reply... i haven't checked this thread out in a long time "blush":eek: ... but thanks again, you were very sweet to look into that book for me, i'll try to get it because now i really am curious about it :D
 

Arabian Gurl

New Member
I really didn't like The Zahir although it was recommended by a Paulo Coelho fan! I couldn't believe I finally finished it! I also got Eleven minutes which I didn't start yet. But I'm having these thoughts Eleven minutes may disappoint me as well however I'm willing to give Paulo Coelho another shot!
 

Aart

New Member
Paulo coelho's new book is out!

THE WINNER STANDS ALONE is a masterpiece: it talks about values lost and never found again. It looks like a thriller, but it is not - the characters are trapped and manipulated by the people Coelho calls "The Superclass". Once more Coelho made it. And I also believe Coelho is one of the few writers that are always exploring unknown seas, instead of repeating the same plot over and over again. Kudos to him.
 

anu

Member
'Eleven Minutes' is the first and only book of Paulo Coelho, I have read so far, and I am amazed by his ability to portray the life of a prostitute in such a dignified manner, never degrading Maria's profession. Paulo has in fact given a sneak peek into her pure soul and her zeal to fulfil her dreams.

I am looking forward to read his Alchemist now.
 

Heteronym

New Member
When you want something the entire Universe conspires in helping you to achieve it:)

So when a mother wants her child to survive an illness and the child of course dies, exactly how did the universe conspire to help her?

Sentimental, hollow maxims that leave me baffled as to how anyone can take them seriously in the world we live in.
 

anu

Member
I recently read The Alchemist, a book that was on my must-read list for quite some time, and I have to confess that I liked it only in parts. The beginning was good, and I was taken in by the strange mythical characters and places Paulo conjured up. I was quite keen to find out whether the shepherd boy actually discovers the treasure or not.

However, the story did falter in the middle, and I just did not find that the term Alchemist does any justice to the story. Probably, it was used by the author to stir the curiosity of the readers.

But the end justified the means. The climax had me in splits and I would recommend this book solely on the good end.

I have read Eleven Minutes and Brida as well. Brida disappointed me totally, promised magic and gave sentimental jumbo. But, I found Eleven Minutes as a sensitive story.
 

beer good

Well-Known Member
Paulo Coelho: James Joyce's Ulysses is 'harmful' to literature | Books | guardian.co.uk

Isn't that kind of like the people behind Scary Movie IV proclaiming The Godfather harmful to cinema?

... and a reply.

The real slander is to the reader, or rather, to readers. Note how the anti-Joyceans have all read him and then tell readers he's not for them: too difficult, too abstruse, too weird – with the "for you" hanging in the background. I've been there, they say, and you wouldn't like it. It is an attitude that surreptitiously belittles the reader. There is nothing as profoundly patronising as a middlebrow, supposedly "literary" author on a soapbox.
 

Polly Parrot

Moderator
Staff member
And another reply.

Another line worth quoting is Mr Coelho’s dictum that a writer has “a duty and an obligation never to be understood by his own generation.” Let’s see here…hmmm...Joyce was the very picture of a starving artist, a virtual exile from his own country, accused of pornography and reviled in his lifetime (and occasionally since) as a writer of unreadable books. Mr Rushdie is similarly big in Tehran. The impossibly avuncular Mr Coelho, on the other hand, may be the Most Understood Author on the planet. Every Coelho bookcover trumpets his success, wooing potential buyers with the promise that he has sold hundreds of millions of copies in over a 160 nations, translated into over 72 languages—the most by a living writer, Guinness confirmed. One wonders if his business card touts: “Over 150 Million Served.”
 

Peder

Well-Known Member
Wow! If all of that is true, I can't for the life of me imagine how he as achieved such numbers. I'm surprised that The Alchemist has sold as many as two copies. :confused:
 

Polly Parrot

Moderator
Staff member
As one who has never really sat down with anything by Coelho, I'm not really qualified to comment. I do wonder what his problem is with Ulysses and Joyce.
 
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