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Suzanne Collins: The Hunger Games trilogy

JuliaR

New Member
Have anyone here started reading The Hunger Games Trilogy? I would recommend it to young adults, but not kids, because it contains a little bit of violence. Teens pitted against each other in order to survive. But I think it's a very interesting book. The third book will be released next month.

I have only red the first one but it was rather good I think... Maybe I should read the other ones...
 

readsalot

Member
If you've read the books, try the audiobooks. It's neat to have someone read the story to you with inflection and drama.
 

Canker

Member
Just read the first book and thought it was ok and will read the other two. This series is about the only thing available on Amazon's new kindle lending library that look interesting.
 

direstraits

Well-Known Member
Ok, finished the first book. It was entertaining, but for the entire time I had Battle Royale at the back of my head. BR was more nuanced and had more space for backstories that motivate each character, which I think contributes to the depth.

That's not to say The Hunger Games wasn't enjoyable. I finished the audiobook on the bed, and this is a first as audiobooks are strictly for commutes. I saw the ending gambit a while away, so I was really curious to see what Collins does to resolve the conflict, and if it does anything like BR to tie things up.

I've read somewhere that Collins said she hadn't even heard of BR before writing THG, but as I read it I find it a little hard to believe. There are more than several obvious similarities. Having said this, it was also pointed out to me that it's hardly the first time that something like this was copied - BR itself was apparently the product of plots from stories that came before it.

To me, however, the similarities are a little too close to wave off. It's kinda like Goodkind saying he's the most original of fantasy authors despite the similarities with The Wheel of Time, and then waving it off as saying Jordan's hardly original himself.
 

DATo

Active Member
When the first book came out all could think was ~~~Teen Lit ~~~~ UHHHH !!! I expected it to be pretty lame. But then I kept hearing the hype everywhere I went so one day I saw it, (The Hunger Games), in the library on DVD. I figured I'd check it out. After all a movie doesn't take nearly as long to get through as a book and if I didn't like it after ten minutes I could turn it off and all I've lost is ten minutes.

As the movie progressed I found myself getting sucked into the story, the fine acting, and the excellent cinematography. In short: I loved the movie. So at this point I'm taking the DVD back to the library, right? Just as you walk in the door there is a "For Sale" table where the library offers books for sale at ridiculously low prices, and there I found the book, in mint condition, for a half dollar. So I bought the book, and even though I knew the story I read it anyway. I was immediately hooked on both Suzanne Collins' story as well as her writing style.

I subsequently read the two other books of the trilogy and look forward to seeing the movies. Unlike The Lord Of The Rings films I will wait till all of the movies are completed and then watch the whole thing at one time.

Unfortunately I learned just before I arrived here at the forum that Philip Sydney Hoffman, who plays Plutarch Heavensbee, has died. I'm sure this will throw a monkey wrench into the completion of the movies.
 

Karen C

Member
I have read all three of the books and loved the first two, the last one was a bit of a chore to be honest. Nowhere near as enjoyable or as good as the first two. It almost seems as if the third one was rushed.

This was actually one of those series which I kept picking up in the shops but kept putting back down without buying as I just wasn't sure whether it was my kind of thing. It was only when an older colleague of mine mentioned how much she was enjoying it that I finally plucked up the courage and purchased a copy. I then read them back to back over the course of about a fortnight, so I would like to re-read them at some point to see if my feelings have changed at all.
 

SuperReaderGirl

Forum Owner
Staff member
I have read all three of the books and loved the first two, the last one was a bit of a chore to be honest. Nowhere near as enjoyable or as good as the first two. It almost seems as if the third one was rushed.
Karen, I think you're right. I - and every reading friend I've talked with who have finished this series - feel the same way. It felt like this book should have been more than one book most likely and that the author was rushing to fit everything into the last few chapters to either meet a deadline or not exceed a preset number of pages. There were so many little threads I would have like to see tied up nicely. Things not mentioned that should have been - like the pearl Peeta gave Katniss, or what happened to the mayor's daughter. I had a whole page of things I was hoping to have resolved that never were and I found that really frustrating.....though how many things are really fully resolved in every day life? In fiction I do expect better resolution, but maybe that isn't fair.
 

DATo

Active Member
I have read all three of the books and loved the first two, the last one was a bit of a chore to be honest. Nowhere near as enjoyable or as good as the first two. It almost seems as if the third one was rushed.

@Karen & SuperReaderGirl
OK, I'm going to play devil's advocate here and say that I DID very much like the last book (except for the 'Epilogue' which I thought was terrible). I'm going to just make a guess that by the time the third book had come out Collins was aware that she was writing not just to teens but to a much broader readership and her writing began to reflect this awareness. Personally, in terms of the quality of the writing, I think Mockingjay was the best of the series; but I agree with both of you that the first two books (especially the first) were the most fun to read.

I absolutely HATED that epilogue!!!! I think Collins just seemed to brush off the whole thing in 'Epilogue'. GOD THE WASTE !!!! She had gold in her hands and blew it!!

How it should have ended:

Katniss and Peeta return to The Capitol for the first time in fifty years at the age of 67. Not to partake in the festivities surrounding the 50th anniversary of the revolution, but to attend the funeral of Haymitch Abernathy who died on the eve of the anniversary. After looking out for Katniss after she returned home after the revolution Haymitch returned to The Capitol by request and became part of the new government. Katniss and Peeta made no money from their book but donated the book to New Panem and it has become the most read book of the fledgling nation. Surviving on a small warrior's pension they live a modest life in old District 12 and return by train to The Capitol in less than stylish clothes. Peeta's limp is evident as they disembark from the train, as is the burn-shrivled, lizard-like skin of Katniss' right hand and arm. A part of Katniss' hair is missing from the burns she endured during the final days of the revolution. They long ago refused all cosmetic treatment for their injuries offered by the government. They stand out conspicuously as old country rubes as they walk down the concrete concourse of the teeming train station which is covered by an enormous domed roof. Crowds are pouring into the Capitol for the celebrations. The television programming throughout the nation for the last week has been broadcasting videos of the revolution and the games in which Peeta and Katniss figured so significantly in their youth. In the distance they can see the sunlight which demarcates the end of the station. As they walk toward it through the jostling crowd of a well-dressed and unscarred populace a young man bumps into Peeta and nearly knocks him down. Apologizing profusely he picks up Peeta's suitcase and hands it back to him. As Peeta pats the young man on the shoulder and tells him to forget it the young man's mouth falls open and he is unable to speak further as he begins to recognize the faces of the two old relics standing before him from the videos he has seen. He whispers to a woman beside him. As Peeta and Katniss continue to the station's exit, by degrees, the entire train station packed with people falls silent. Parents pull their children from before their path and whisper quietly to them as the children's eyes rise in wonder to view the two elderly people walking toward them. The sea of people before them staring, some with tears in their eyes, silently parts to make way. As they approach the exit, in the distance, soft but distinct, Katniss hears a whistled melody no doubt acquired from the videos. She hears it again, and again, and again. Now it is hummed. Now it is sung. It is sounded from a thousand quarters of the station. A simple melody. Rue's melody. Katniss and Peeta turn to see behind them a sea of upraised arms and at the end of each arm three extended fingers. Katniss and Peeta are surrounded by a throng of human mockingjays. (which reinforces the title of the book - an appropriately metaphorical ending) She and Peeta look into each others faces, smile, turn, and walk into the sunlight.


This ending is about as long as Collins' ending but says so much more and is far more poignant. But more importantly it provides (once again, in my opinion only) a better sense of closure. I'm sure it could be written better than I have written it but the the general content speaks to a better resolution of the series.
 

SuperReaderGirl

Forum Owner
Staff member
Fabulous ending, DATo! I enjoyed book three as well, I just felt like the end was so very rushed. She threw everything quickly into that epilogue and it didn't feel like a very satisfying end that way.
 

Karen C

Member
Wow! That actually brought a tear to my eye DATo.

I did like the third book, but it just felt like there was something missing. I do, however, think the third book will make a really good movie!
 

DATo

Active Member
Thank you both. I know my ending is a bit sappy but Collins' ending was so "cold" that I started to sneeze.
 

Roxbrough

Member
Read in a day, as there are very few scene setting passages and the writing style is quite simplistic. I enjoyed it and mentally compared it to the movie.
Both are aimed at young adults and this explains the writing style. Having now finished the book I am convinced the casting people chose the wrong actress for the role. In the book Catnip is described as slim, pretty and starving, not plain and fat.
Still I would recommend the book to any one between the age of 10 and 25, or older if you just want to slum.
7.75

p.s. got the book as a free download and read it on the hudl, so it cost me very little, I'm not sure if I'd have felt so positive toward it if I had paid for it.
 

DATo

Active Member
I liked the fact that the movie followed the storyline closely. As is often the case movie directors can decimate a book with their "creativity".

With regard to the appearance of the Katniss character I can only say that she was indeed not PRESENTED as glamorous though I feel that the actual actress, Jennifer Lawrence, is one of the most beautiful young actresses in Hollywood: but, you see, that is exactly what lent a sense of realism to the movie for me. Cinema asks us to always believe that leading ladies must forever be presented as beauty queens which is hardly realistic when one compare the real life individuals from which some movies are made which depict real life events. If you have ever seen the movie Monster it would be impossible to imagine the stunningly beautiful actress, Charlize Theron, in the appearance of the character she represented in the film.

It is my understanding that Suzanne Collins originally wrote for a much younger audience, then graduated to teens with The Hunger Game and by the end of the trilogy I felt that the final book, Mockingjay, was intentionally written for an older readership. It is interesting to note that most young people find Mockingjay to be the least favorite book of the series.*L*

Glad you enjoyed the book!
 
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