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Agatha Christie: The Murder On The Links

Nellie

New Member
My Agatha Christie challenge continues and we are back on familiar territory here, with Poirot and Hastings teaming up once again to solve a murder. The two friends receive a letter from Paul Reynaud a wealthy businessman living in France. By the time Poirot and Hastings reach the Reynaud's villa, Paul Reynaud has been murdered, stabbed in the back and his body left on a local golf course. There are the usual range of suspects including, Mrs Reynauld, the next door neighbour and her daughter and a son who stands to inherit a huge fortune. The local police are called in and Poirot meets an investigator who is as arrogant as he is. The exchanges between the two detectives are very funny as both recognises each other's faults, but cannot see those same faults in themselves, although towards the end, the rivalry becomes quite vicious and Poirot shows that he has a very unpleasant streak in him.

As with all Christie novels, the clues are there, but in this story they are thrust into the readers face with none of the sleight of hand I am used to. What was more irritating is that I don't think it is possible to put the clues together to get some idea of what might be going on until quite late into the book. Although Christie's plots are highly improbable, I do always feel that I could have solved it myself had I been alert enough to pick up all the subtle clues.

This book feel less well crafted that the previous two, there are far too many characters on the French investigation team, although this may reflect the reality of French Law Enforcement at the time. The problem with having so many detectives and magistrates is that it becomes hard to remember who has seen what. There is also a ridiculous subplot of Hastings falling in love, which is poorly written and made me cringe.

As a great Christie fan, I am sad to say that this story is not on of her best, and you would be better reading one of her other books.
 

sanyuja

New Member
I too read this some time back. I posted this on another thread. Will just repeat it here.

I read it a few weeks back. I think I liked one or two stories, but the rest were pretty lame. I remember the one which involves a father and two daughters and some drugs. That was stupid!

This is definitely not Christie's best. There are a few stories which grabbed my attention, but that's about it.

After reading her short stories, I prefer her novels. The reason why I like Christie is because she takes a lot of effort to paint the crime scene. She presents the same incident(s) with different perspectives using different characters and slips in a clue somewhere which the intelligent reader is supposed to identify. There are some novels where this is not the case (I don't remember the name of the book, but the story involved some old woman who used to be a jailer or something) where a vital clue is hidden from the readers, but a majority of Christie novels are not like this.
 

mmyap

Member
There is also a ridiculous subplot of Hastings falling in love, which is poorly written and made me cringe.

I just watched this movie starring David Suchet. We cringed when Hasting's did it on screen too. It wasn't any better on screen. :lol:

I did recently get a chance to read "And Then There Where None" which I really enjoyed. I couldn't figure out "who done it" until it was explained at the end. Very psychological.
 

velocipede2288

New Member
Just finished, Agatha Christie's The Hollow. A Hercule Poirot thriller.
This was a disappointment. Nothing happened except the empty chatter of the born rich for a third of the book, and Poirot didn't get into it untill half way through. No real detective work in this book.
 

C. M. Albrecht

New Member
My Agatha Christie challenge continues and we are back on familiar territory here, with Poirot and Hastings teaming up once again to solve a murder. The two friends receive a letter from Paul Reynaud a wealthy businessman living in France. By the time Poirot and Hastings reach the Reynaud's villa, Paul Reynaud has been murdered, stabbed in the back and his body left on a local golf course. There are the usual range of suspects including, Mrs Reynauld, the next door neighbour and her daughter and a son who stands to inherit a huge fortune. The local police are called in and Poirot meets an investigator who is as arrogant as he is. The exchanges between the two detectives are very funny as both recognises each other's faults, but cannot see those same faults in themselves, although towards the end, the rivalry becomes quite vicious and Poirot shows that he has a very unpleasant streak in him.

As with all Christie novels, the clues are there, but in this story they are thrust into the readers face with none of the sleight of hand I am used to. What was more irritating is that I don't think it is possible to put the clues together to get some idea of what might be going on until quite late into the book. Although Christie's plots are highly improbable, I do always feel that I could have solved it myself had I been alert enough to pick up all the subtle clues.

This book feel less well crafted that the previous two, there are far too many characters on the French investigation team, although this may reflect the reality of French Law Enforcement at the time. The problem with having so many detectives and magistrates is that it becomes hard to remember who has seen what. There is also a ridiculous subplot of Hastings falling in love, which is poorly written and made me cringe.

As a great Christie fan, I am sad to say that this story is not on of her best, and you would be better reading one of her other books.
 

C. M. Albrecht

New Member
You're right, but what the heck. I've read all the Agatha Christie mysteries at least twice and some several times. Nobody bowls 300 all the time.
 

JCBC

New Member
I had forgotten about Murder on the Links, I read it so long ago. Maybe not her best, but it has Christie style.
 
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