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Can kids read too much?

Sin

New Member
I just wanted to share a thought that came to my mind recently and doesn't want to go away.
Is it possible that your kid is reading too much?
Is it possible that he or she is replacing the real world with the imaginary world from the books?
Should we put the limits and where are they?

Do you have any thoughts about this?
 

brolie

Member
NO

"after three days without reading conversation becomes flavorless" - lao tzu

children who are prone to read instead of socialize may not need to be taken away from books but maybe be introduced to a group of children their age that are also absorbed in books... if anything it will help expand their mind and help when they are older but yeah, they may have a rough childhood and adolescence but who doesnt?

i know that, although i am 23, reading is my ONLY form of escape from my real life. being a single parent of two kids i dont get to do much else, so i get to escape from reality when im reading.. the escape can be a good thing to an extent, but i know that both of my kids are picking up their books the same time i do so they can be like mommy and i read my books out loud to them. children are so anti reading in schools now that having a kid who loves to read is a rarity and hopefully it catches on heh..

anyway, thats my rant for the day ;p
 

Sin

New Member
I agree with you partially but it scares me when people say "reading is my ONLY form of escape from my real life".
For me, reading should not be escape from any life. It sounds like Matrix!
Reading should be something that will help you to better understand your own life and world around you, not to replace it. Something that will help you to socialize with other people, not to make you distant form other people or make you feel odd, or weird.
My reading son has problem to socialize, and I would not like him to escape from his challenges but to fight them.
Maybe I just worry too much.
Thanks for your replay and good luck with your kids.
 
Everyone has a different reason for reading, some hunger for information, others want to escape from reality, many want to read about someone with a similar problem as theirs or a similar hope or dream. There is nothing wrong with fantasy or escapism, it does not mean that a person does not wish to live their own life, or that they wish to remove themselves from society, it has to do with broadening horizons and imagination. Think about reading about another culture for the first time, or a period long ago in history; the sense of escaping into that society, or learning what life is like for those people in that place and time. It's imagination and it's also escape. That is not to say that a person, child or no, can't end up trying to escape from their life, but it is definitely not a given.

I don't have children, but I was a voracious reader as a child, and I believe my mom wondered about the same thing you are now, Sin. My personal opinion echoes that of brolie, a child that reads a great deal can be introduced to other children that also read a great deal and thus broaden their social circle. Those children can also be encouraged to discuss their books with family, or in a journal or blog. Discussing a book can help to put it in perspective, whether you are a child or adult, and regardless of the subject of the book.

If your son has problems socializing, but loves to read, ask your local library or school librarian what events they have for children his age. Most public library have many events that bring children like that together.

Good luck!
 

Gilgamesh

New Member
To me, I think yes in a way, only because kids do not know how to prioritize their work. My kids would be sitting in front of the dining table reading instead of eating.

Re-reads Harry Potters in restrooms, sitting for an hour.

My kid's teacher said, "He doesn't do the classroom assignments, because he's reading his books."

After making several simple mistakes on a test once, my dau said, "I forgot to check my answers because I wanted get back to reading after the test was done." Now she knows better.

Kids don't want me to turn off their lights at nights because they want to continue their reading.
 
Kids don't want me to turn off their lights at nights because they want to continue their reading.

Kids aren't the only ones! Point taken, and a good one, although it still doesn't mean that reading too much is necessarily a form of escapism. Reading too much to the detriment of other activities is just a matter of setting priorities, not that it should be taken lightly.
 

Sin

New Member
Everyone has a different reason for reading, some hunger for information, others want to escape from reality, many want to read about someone with a similar problem as theirs or a similar hope or dream. There is nothing wrong with fantasy or escapism, it does not mean that a person does not wish to live their own life, or that they wish to remove themselves from society, it has to do with broadening horizons and imagination. Think about reading about another culture for the first time, or a period long ago in history; the sense of escaping into that society, or learning what life is like for those people in that place and time. It's imagination and it's also escape. That is not to say that a person, child or no, can't end up trying to escape from their life, but it is definitely not a given.

Yes, I can agree with that.

I don't have children, but I was a voracious reader as a child, and I believe my mom wondered about the same thing you are now, Sin. My personal opinion echoes that of brolie, a child that reads a great deal can be introduced to other children that also read a great deal and thus broaden their social circle. Those children can also be encouraged to discuss their books with family, or in a journal or blog. Discussing a book can help to put it in perspective, whether you are a child or adult, and regardless of the subject of the book.

What worries me is that my son doesn't have any real friends. Other kids are either boring or rude to him.
Last year, in grade 3, he was identified as a gifted child. Next week he is starting grade 4 in a new school with other gifted children. So I hope that he will be able to find other kids with similar interests and make friends with them.

If your son has problems socializing, but loves to read, ask your local library or school librarian what events they have for children his age. Most public library have many events that bring children like that together.

My son reads books very fast so we have to go to the library quite often. We have visited some of the events for kids there and he really enjoyed it. However, that's a place where you meet whit other kids only once or twice and never again. So you can't really find a friend there.

Thank you for your comments.
 

Sin

New Member
To me, I think yes in a way, only because kids do not know how to prioritize their work. My kids would be sitting in front of the dining table reading instead of eating.

Re-reads Harry Potters in restrooms, sitting for an hour.

My kid's teacher said, "He doesn't do the classroom assignments, because he's reading his books."

After making several simple mistakes on a test once, my dau said, "I forgot to check my answers because I wanted get back to reading after the test was done." Now she knows better.

Kids don't want me to turn off their lights at nights because they want to continue their reading.

We don't have such problems. My kids sometimes forget to make their bed or brush their teeth, but they never read at the dining table or in school when they have other assignments.

So I guess I should be happy.

Thanks, Gilgamesh.
 

Manny Bullpucky

New Member
No, they can't read too much. In fact they probably aren't reading enough! I know we want our kids to be socially functional, but do they really have to be some idealized specimen inside the bell curve? So what if they are a little shy or not as socially comfortable as some others. How about a little variety amongst our society rather than cookie cutter personalities. I'm weird. I dont' talk much and I spend most of my spare money and time reading and hanging out at the bookstore. And I'm totally comfortable with that. I don't care if I'm a little bit awkward in social situations and why should it matter?
 

abecedarian

Well-Known Member
No, they can't read too much. In fact they probably aren't reading enough! I know we want our kids to be socially functional, but do they really have to be some idealized specimen inside the bell curve? So what if they are a little shy or not as socially comfortable as some others. How about a little variety amongst our society rather than cookie cutter personalities. I'm weird. I dont' talk much and I spend most of my spare money and time reading and hanging out at the bookstore. And I'm totally comfortable with that. I don't care if I'm a little bit awkward in social situations and why should it matter?

Think about it. Who is more interesting to talk to? The outgoing, but ininformed person, or the quiet, but well-read one? I'll take more time drawing out the quiet person I know might have something interesting to say. Some people are harder to talk to than others, but whether they read a lot doesn't always play a role in that scenario. But, give me a reader, and we'll find SOMETHING to talk about. Let the kids read as much as they want. This time in their lives is so short, they likely will never have as much free time as they do now. Well, unless they're running all the time to different lessons, events, etc.. but that's a topic for another thread.
 
My son reads books very fast so we have to go to the library quite often. We have visited some of the events for kids there and he really enjoyed it. However, that's a place where you meet whit other kids only once or twice and never again. So you can't really find a friend there.
I'm sorry to hear that; our public library has a regular contingent of parents and children that come back every week. That's for preschool and elementary, and I'm not sure what age your son is, but a lot of libraries have reading related events that are more often. This may not help you, but I know of a few libraries that have game night once a week, and even if the same kids don't go every week, it can be a good opportunity for a child to get out of his/her shell.

Wish I had some better suggestions for you, Sin.
 

Sin

New Member
I'm sorry to hear that; our public library has a regular contingent of parents and children that come back every week. That's for preschool and elementary, and I'm not sure what age your son is, but a lot of libraries have reading related events that are more often. This may not help you, but I know of a few libraries that have game night once a week, and even if the same kids don't go every week, it can be a good opportunity for a child to get out of his/her shell.

Wish I had some better suggestions for you, Sin.

That's OK. Thank you for your suggestion.
My older son is 8 now.
There are some programs in our library but they are mainly for toddlers.
There were several events during the summer break for older kids and he liked it.
I guess it has to do with the community in which you live too. Whitby, where I live, is a typical "bedroom" community. Toronto's suburb with all characteristics of the typical suburb (sprawled, soulless, lacking local community centers, day-cares etc...) But that's another topic.
 

Libra

Active Member
I agree with you partially but it scares me when people say "reading is my ONLY form of escape from my real life".
For me, reading should not be escape from any life. It sounds like Matrix!

I think by escape she meant from her everyday routine,lol,it's hard to escape two kids.:lol:

When I see my kids with books in their hands I smile and hope they continue and "get" the same appreciation out of books like I do.

Sin,take a look at this site,I didn't delve into the subjects but you might find something to guide you with your son's interest to book lovers like himself.
Scholastic Canada | Home
 

brolie

Member
I think by escape she meant from her everyday routine,lol,it's hard to escape two kids.:lol:

thank you ^_^ i was trying to figure out how to better portray what i was trying to say... thats exactly what i meant...

and u are absolutely right, my daughter is two and my son is one and they dont sleep at the same time, eat at the same time, or cry at the same time... when one finally stops the other one starts up... so if i get a chance to sneak a chapter or two in while they play, its dealing with someone else's problems instead of mine for a minute. haha.
 

Gilgamesh

New Member
.
Maybe I just worry too much.

Have you tried putting your kid in organized sports or Boy Scouts? I know they take alot of time out you and your spouse. But, it's a definite way to tackle your subject. Basketball season is coming up.
 

Sin

New Member
Maybe you are right, Gilgamesh.
As most of the parents here, we have already enrolled both kids in such activities.
So we will be driving them all over the place :)

After thinking it over again, I concluded that I can't blame "reading too much" for his social (or anti-social) behaviour.

Thanks again for all your inputs. If you ever get to Whitby you have a free beer from me.
 
I've been an avid reader since I was 11. I've always had friends and been social. I played sports, video games, etc.. I don't think reading a lot will have negative effects as long as you don't become an absolute hermit. That said, some people are naturally antisocial. Maybe they are meant to be philosophers :D
 

funrun

New Member
children should have balance to read to play to eat,sleep and to do what they have to do and what they want
reading is never alot .they need to be set rules when to read and when not to .and when school work needs to be done.:cool:
 

SFG75

Well-Known Member
Sin-I hear you about activities. Soccer practices, dance lessons, t-ball, and other such things only get worse as kids get older. The older teachers I work with say tha my schedule is nothing compared to theirs. Their high school kids are lucky to make it home before 9 or 10 due to practice and "socializing" obligations. If my kids are 16 and stay home and read, I can think of worse problems to handle than that. I know, I was that age once too.:whistling:
 

Sin

New Member
I know I shouldn’t be complaining. I was just wondering if I did something wrong and can I do something to help him?

I see that as a society we have become too obsessed with our children. Now we spend so much time driving our kids around, waiting for them to do their sports, driving them to other kids’ homes for “socializing events”, etc.

I grew up in a totally different environment and my parents never had to do things I am doing now. I would just go out in the street and there was always somebody out there to play with. My parents usually didn’t know where I am. I would just come back at dinner time. But now we are so worried about our kids’ security and try to protect them with bubble-wrap.

I know there are worse cases than my but it’s not very comforting - on the contrary. I always ask myself if it will become any better over the time.
 
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