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Daily greetings

pontalba

Well-Known Member
Hi Pontalba. Did you see the 1 season of the Dresden Files they made for TV? It's much fun but of course books are better!

No, I haven't. We are out in the country, and don't get good antenna signals. And we dropped the cable about 5 years ago. We do stream Amazon though and have Prime. I'll take a look-see on there. :) I can kind of see how the attraction would lessen in the transition from book to film. Well, doesn't it (almost) always? :)

It's just like the Outlander series by Gabaldon. I've followed the casting of the characters, and mostly don't agree with their choices. Not my mental pictures. Oh well. :rolleyes:
 

quilter Kathy

Active Member
Carolyn!
Welcome back! Great to see you!
I haven't heard of the Dresden Files books. So I have put the first one on audio on hold at my library. Thank you for the recommendation.
Kathy
 

bogsc

Member
Carolyn!
Welcome back! Great to see you!
I haven't heard of the Dresden Files books. So I have put the first one on audio on hold at my library. Thank you for the recommendation.
Kathy
Hi Kathy! Hope you love them as much as I do. I'm on Fool Moon at the moment.
 

bogsc

Member
No, I haven't. We are out in the country, and don't get good antenna signals. And we dropped the cable about 5 years ago. We do stream Amazon though and have Prime. I'll take a look-see on there. :) I can kind of see how the attraction would lessen in the transition from book to film. Well, doesn't it (almost) always? :)

It's just like the Outlander series by Gabaldon. I've followed the casting of the characters, and mostly don't agree with their choices. Not my mental pictures. Oh well. :rolleyes:
I haven't been able to take on the Outlander series yet. My partner read the first in the series and found it very difficult to get through. Do they get easier? Should I "pull up my big girl pants" and tackle this one?
 

pontalba

Well-Known Member
I haven't been able to take on the Outlander series yet. My partner read the first in the series and found it very difficult to get through. Do they get easier? Should I "pull up my big girl pants" and tackle this one?

:D I think, like all complicated series, they can be difficult. I didn't find the first as difficult as one or two of the later ones. Time travel is a complicating factor, and geographically they are very wide ranging. They become richer I feel as the series progresses.

Let me rephrase.....complicated isn't exactly right. Call them very involved/involving. Addictive even. I picked up the first one quite casually. In a grocery store we didn't usually frequent actually. That was about 20 years ago. I immediately bought the sequel. :cool:

So, I guess I would have to give you a resounding.....YES!
 

bogsc

Member
:D I think, like all complicated series, they can be difficult. I didn't find the first as difficult as one or two of the later ones. Time travel is a complicating factor, and geographically they are very wide ranging. They become richer I feel as the series progresses.

Let me rephrase.....complicated isn't exactly right. Call them very involved/involving. Addictive even. I picked up the first one quite casually. In a grocery store we didn't usually frequent actually. That was about 20 years ago. I immediately bought the sequel. :cool:

So, I guess I would have to give you a resounding.....YES!
Guess I'll be adding that back to my library queue then!
 

pontalba

Well-Known Member
I haven't been able to take on the Outlander series yet. My partner read the first in the series and found it very difficult to get through. Do they get easier? Should I "pull up my big girl pants" and tackle this one?

:D I think, like all complicated series, they can be difficult. I didn't find the first as difficult as one or two of the later ones. Time travel is a complicating factor, and geographically they are very wide ranging. They become richer I feel as the series progresses.

Let me rephrase.....complicated isn't exactly right. Call them very involved/involving. Addictive even. I picked up the first one quite casually. In a grocery store we didn't usually frequent actually. That was about 20 years ago. I immediately bought the sequel. :cool:

So, I guess I would have to give you a resounding.....YES!

Hafta tell you bogsc, the last installation to the Outlander series was only a 3/5. I don't know if I'm just getting tired of it, or Gabaldon is. There were some great moments in it, but too much of a rehash, IMO. I put a sorta review over on my journal thread downstairs.
 

readingomnivore

Well-Known Member
One of the great newsmen of the twentieth century, and a devoted supporter of authors and reading on local public television, passed today. RIP John Siegenthaler. Ya' done good.

In Memoriam: Our Friend John Seigenthaler (1927-2014)

John Seigenthaler (1927-2014) was the host of A Word on Words for 42 years.

As much as John Seigenthaler was a part of our family here, it's easy to forget that, essentially, he was a volunteer. For 42 years, he hosted A Word on Words with John Seigenthaler. Not as a paid employee, but as a volunteer, dedicated to serving this community and honoring the integrity of the written word. "Keep reading," he told us at the end of every episode, whether he was sitting across from a New York Times bestselling author, a politician who'd written a manifesto on public policy, a local historian, or a first time author with a collection of short stories. He took his own advice seriously, reading everything before the cameras rolled. Kevin Crane, vice president of content and technology and executive producer of A Word on Words tells us that "in all my years of working with John on A Word on Words, it never failed to amaze me, especially during the Southern Festival of Books when we'd do more than a dozen interviews in a weekend, how engaged he was with each author. He read every book, much to the surprise of the authors, who were not used to that much attention and respect."
He was prepared, too, as any staffer lucky to snag a copy of a book he used on the show knows. The back pages were full of notes.
Beth Curley, NPT's president and CEO recalls that John's love of literature "inspired and informed my own reading, as it did for all of us at the station, all who watched the show, and all who sat across from him on the set."
But he did more, she added:
"John was extremely supportive of me when I arrived at NPT 15 years ago, where he was already an established presence and host of A Word on Words for 25 years and counting. He had an invaluable influence on the way we conducted ourselves as journalists at NPT, and was always there to provide us guidance. He was also a gifted Nashville historian; always willing to be a resource for us on our Nashville history documentaries."
When the Anniversary of the Freedom Rides came in 2011, an event pivotal in John's career, he was understandably much in demand. But he always had time for us. He hosted our own reunion of Nashville Freedom Riders just days after appearing on Oprah, made time for multiple screenings of the Freedom Riders documentary and even spoke to a roomful of public television employees when our national conference was in Nashville. He was tireless when it came to telling the story of the Freedom Riders, because he knew it was an important story. That was why every time he told it, whether recalling his own harrowing brush with death or how Diane Nash and the other riders signed their own last will and testaments, audiences were moved and inspired.
We were always moved and inspired by John, especially every time he came in the door to tape a new batch of shows. These last few years gave us plenty of opportunities, too, as he showed no sign of slowing down. He taped 48 shows in 2012-2013, and enough this year to last us until September. He was, you could say, the most dedicated volunteer in the history of public television. He was also a friend, and a part of our family. We'll miss him deeply, and keep reading.

Linda S.
 

janebbooks

Member
One of the great newsmen of the twentieth century, and a devoted supporter of authors and reading on local public television, passed today. RIP John Siegenthaler. Ya' done good.

In Memoriam: Our Friend John Seigenthaler (1927-2014).

Linda S.
What a lovely eulogy, Linda....and what a lovely man your friend John Seigenthaler must have been.
Some folks are rather irreplaceable....aren't they?

Jane
 

readingomnivore

Well-Known Member
What a lovely eulogy, Linda....and what a lovely man your friend John Seigenthaler must have been.
Some folks are rather irreplaceable....aren't they?

Jane
Jane,

I wish I'd written it--it was the announcement published by the Nashville PBS station, WNPT, where Siegenthaler had the WORD ON WORDS program for forty years. Wonderful 30-minute program where he sat down with an author and discussed the author's book and writing process with him/her.

His (and the Tennessean's) influence helped keep integration in Nashville and Middle Tennessee from being as violent as in many other places.

The thing that scares me is that the passing of his generation leaves a vacuum in wisdom and leadership that I see few of a suitable caliber to replace. We're losing giants, and we're getting overgrown kids as replacements. "If you don't do what I want, I'll take my marbles and go home."
 
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