1. Welcome to BookAndReader!

    We LOVE books and hope you'll join us in sharing your favorites and experiences along with your love of reading with our community. Registering for our site is free and easy, just CLICK HERE!

    Already a member and forgot your password? Click here.

Vladimir Nabokov: Lolita

Discussion in 'Fiction Books' started by Love4OneAnother, Oct 22, 2004.

  1. Dork

    Dork New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2006
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    Hard Eight -JE and Door to December by Dean Koontz
    Oh my goodness. I'm sorry LOL I meant chapters. awww.myspacesmilies.com_smilies_happy0040.gif
    It wasn't the content or anything, I found it boring, maybe I didn't give it time enough.
    But I also have adult a.d.d so YANNO. awww.myspacesmilies.com_smilies_ashamed0005.gif
     
  2. tundra

    tundra New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2006
    Messages:
    337
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    The Hours - Michael Cunningham

    I had trouble reading this book as well. I checked it out in honor of this forum, actually (and the trillion Lolita posts), just a couple weeks ago and sat down to read it. The style was good, it was well written and interesting, but I just couldn't stomach the subject matter. All his descriptions of Lolita made me want to vomit. I read around 15 chapters and then skimmed the rest. Shudder.
     
  3. Libra6Poe

    Libra6Poe New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2005
    Messages:
    1,973
    Likes Received:
    2
    Currently Reading:
    Clive Barker's Tapping the Vein
  4. The waveguide

    The waveguide Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2005
    Messages:
    351
    Likes Received:
    1
    I read the book. I was impressed. When I read a good book, the writer manages to read me into it ( a reader of Jasper Fforde would know what I mean :)

    So at times I felt Lolita. I felt desperate little girl, with nobody around me, with dirt all over, with no-light-at-the-end-of-the-tunnel. I cried.

    At times I felt like HH. I looked at little girls in a public transport and I knew what he felt. I knew what he was talking about when he laughed at psychiatrists. I found it extremely funny and I felt wiser than they were. I know what HH was like.

    And because I know HH (I was him when I was reading) and because at times I felt also like Lola- if I would ever have a daugher, no man will NEVER EVER get closer than hundreds of kilometers to her. One who dares would be castrated without any possibility to explain himself. What else can a parent do to protect his/her child? - may be the answer is not to have any - it would solve the whole problem, would not it?
     
  5. SFG75

    SFG75 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2005
    Messages:
    7,133
    Likes Received:
    90
    Currently Reading:
    The Road to Character; David Brooks
    I'm a little late to this response, but here it goes. I too, didn't like the beginning about his fateful marriage. I found that part to be rather dry. Fortunately, I ventured on.:D
     
  6. Jim Cantor

    Jim Cantor New Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2007
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    Dances with Werewolves by Niki Flynn
    Lolita

    I started this book because a (female) friend told me it was the best book she'd ever read.

    I expected to find it titillating. Just because the subject matter was taboo.

    I came away feeling that Nabokov, writing in his third (?) language, was the greatest master of English that I'd met. Titillating? No, not really. Erotic? No, not really. But stunning for the language and the evocation of small-town American in the fifties. Stunning for its portrait of obsession.

    Adrian Lyne's movie captures it. Kubrick's doesn't.

    Jim
     
  7. Jim Cantor

    Jim Cantor New Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2007
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    Dances with Werewolves by Niki Flynn
    No, I don't agree. Jeremy Irons in Adrian's Lyne's version catches the spirit of the book exactly. Kubrick doesn't. But your quote brings exactly to mind the parts of the book that Irons/Lyne _do_ capture. The wistfulness, the longing. Watch it again. The book is unmatchable, but Lyne's film version is a truly brilliant evocation.

    Jim
     
  8. beer good

    beer good Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2006
    Messages:
    5,510
    Likes Received:
    52
    Currently Reading:
    "NW", Smith
    One of the first things I stumble across in my re-read of Crime and Punishment is this.

    Vladimir Nabokov, 1955: setting up the scene where Lolita learns she has lost everything and (at least according to Humbert) voluntarily surrenders to her rapist captor:
    Fyodor Dostoevsky, 1866. Marmeladov telling of how his wife had lost everything and had to re-marry a drunken useless widower (ie himself):
    Hmmmm...?
     
  9. SFG75

    SFG75 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2005
    Messages:
    7,133
    Likes Received:
    90
    Currently Reading:
    The Road to Character; David Brooks
    What a catch beer!. Holy cow, now that's observant.:eek: I could see how perhaps he read Crime and Punishment and perhaps later on, accidentally "remember" it, but not the real soruce it was from. Of course, that doesn't excuse it, but I think it would be the most logical explanation. Then again, it isn't the first time he was accused of not being so *original*

    Scholar says Nabokov lifted Lolita from German author.
     
  10. beer good

    beer good Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2006
    Messages:
    5,510
    Likes Received:
    52
    Currently Reading:
    "NW", Smith
    I'm not so sure it's as much a case of Nabokov being unoriginal, rather another of quite a few very deliberate references to other works; there's tons of references to Poe and Flaubert as well, for instance - I guess much of that has been covered before in this thread. After all, Humbert is not only a liar but a well-read liar.

    And that "Ur-Lolita" has been discussed at length in Nabokov circles, I think. I think I saw a link a while back... I'll try to remember where.
     
  11. SFG75

    SFG75 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2005
    Messages:
    7,133
    Likes Received:
    90
    Currently Reading:
    The Road to Character; David Brooks
    I was convinced that Nabokov cheated when Lolita constantly held a stine, wore long-stockings, took off with Humbert in a VW, not to mention when she looked longingly over maps of France.
     
  12. clementine

    clementine New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2007
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    What a book

    The Book is phenomenal
    Words cannot describe it so thats where i leave off
    Always,Clementine
     
  13. StillILearn

    StillILearn New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2005
    Messages:
    3,495
    Likes Received:
    7
    Currently Reading:
    Anything I can lay my hands on
    You just said a mouthful, Clementine. :D
     
  14. clementine

    clementine New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2007
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    I was wanting to read Ada or Ardor and I was wondering if it is worth the time. I love Nabokov so it wouldn't take to much to convince me. But a comparison to Lolita would be interesting.
     
  15. AsherNZ

    AsherNZ New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2007
    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    Eat Pray Love: Elizabeth Gilbert
    I'm planning to read Lolita soon. Are there any other books by the author (or any other for that matter) that anyone recommends I read before it?
    :)
     
  16. silverseason

    silverseason New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2007
    Messages:
    611
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    Usually one fiction/novel and one nonfiction.
    I'm not well read in Nabokov and I haven't read Lolita yet, but I enjoyed Pnim and Speak Memory.
     
  17. Robert

    Robert Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2005
    Messages:
    3,988
    Likes Received:
    22
    Currently Reading:
    The Odyssey by Homer
    I hesitated to read this book because I was a little disappointed in the last book I read by Nabokov (King, Queen, Knave). I finally picked up a copy at the library and I can honestly say that I’m glad I did.

    Reading the book, I was struck by the beauty of the writing and the tender feelings expressed by HH. At the same time, I was angered with HH because these feeling, at least early on, were nothing more then lust for a twelve-year-old girl.

    I was reading comments from others that have read this wonderful book and I was a little surprised that people could feel sympathy for HH and the question that I have to ask myself is why? Is this an example of Stockholm syndrome?

    HH is intelligent and charming and he is a monster. He tries to lessen his crimes by citing historical precedence. He tries to convince his reader that he would never have not have harmed Lolita (he would have left her purity intact), and that she seduced him (like he, the adult, could not say no to a child). Then of course he uses threats to keep his sex slave until she escapes with another pedophile.

    My heart bled for Lolita, a precocious 12-year-old girl badly in need of the kind of direction that her mother and later HH were either unable or unwilling to give her. I wonder why Nabokov choose death for her when it finally seemed she was forever free of HH?
     
  18. pontalba

    pontalba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2005
    Messages:
    4,345
    Likes Received:
    148
    Currently Reading:
    dithering...
    Robert,
    I for one was convinced that HH showed repentance, so had to...maybe not forgive, but at least attempt to understand how this came about. He was a victim himself to some extent and while there was no excuse for what he did, I must at least acknowledge how it came about.

    Not Stockholm Syndrome as I understand it. You are referring to Lolita herself? Or the reader?

    Lolita had to be dead for the story to be published, part of the structure Nabokov used. HH wrote the story with the stipulation [noted in the Foreword] it would not be published if she was living.
     
  19. Robert

    Robert Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2005
    Messages:
    3,988
    Likes Received:
    22
    Currently Reading:
    The Odyssey by Homer
    The comment about Stockholm Syndrome was due to comments some of the readers wrote about HH.
     
  20. Robert

    Robert Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2005
    Messages:
    3,988
    Likes Received:
    22
    Currently Reading:
    The Odyssey by Homer
    I suppose that I should add that I understand that Stockholm Syndrome usually refers to the victums of a crime, but I believe it fits since HH's arguments are good enough to convince the readers that he is not a monster.
     

Share This Page