1. Welcome to BookAndReader!

    We LOVE books and hope you'll join us in sharing your favorites and experiences along with your love of reading with our community. Registering for our site is free and easy, just CLICK HERE!

    Already a member and forgot your password? Click here.

Lovely and abandoned words

Discussion in 'General Book Discussion' started by Wabbit, Jun 18, 2006.

  1. StillILearn

    StillILearn New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2005
    Messages:
    3,495
    Likes Received:
    7
    Currently Reading:
    Anything I can lay my hands on
    Twitterpated.
     
  2. SFG75

    SFG75 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2005
    Messages:
    7,133
    Likes Received:
    90
    Currently Reading:
    The Road to Character; David Brooks
    Diaphonous

    Recently reminded of it in Fathers and Sons. It's one that should be used more often.
     
  3. StillILearn

    StillILearn New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2005
    Messages:
    3,495
    Likes Received:
    7
    Currently Reading:
    Anything I can lay my hands on
    Zany

    ............
     
  4. Gem

    Gem kickbox

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2005
    Messages:
    1,160
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    A Book.
    What about words that over time aquire additional meaning, take for instance this old batman comic...Click Here
     
  5. StillILearn

    StillILearn New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2005
    Messages:
    3,495
    Likes Received:
    7
    Currently Reading:
    Anything I can lay my hands on
    evanesced

    ...............
     
  6. raffaellabella

    raffaellabella New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2005
    Messages:
    313
    Likes Received:
    2
    Currently Reading:
    The Woman In White by Wilkie Collins
    What did the mean by "boner"?
     
  7. Gem

    Gem kickbox

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2005
    Messages:
    1,160
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    A Book.
    I think it meant blunder/error.
     
  8. raffaellabella

    raffaellabella New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2005
    Messages:
    313
    Likes Received:
    2
    Currently Reading:
    The Woman In White by Wilkie Collins
  9. beer good

    beer good Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2006
    Messages:
    5,510
    Likes Received:
    52
    Currently Reading:
    "NW", Smith
    I'd recommend anyone with a slightly perverse sense of humour and an interest in superhero comics to check out that entire site. Completely hilarious.
     
  10. Gem

    Gem kickbox

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2005
    Messages:
    1,160
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    A Book.
    beergood,perverse? I thought it was healthy :D , will have to reevaluate my sense of humour. Poor Robin, he always has to carry the burden for the relationship;) .

    I came across the word Moiety (a half) today and was rather taken with it, (although that could be because it reminds me of Professor Moriarty:rolleyes: )
     
  11. Pinecones360

    Pinecones360 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2006
    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    Wicked
    lassitude...vocabulary word from school.
     
  12. bren

    bren Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2006
    Messages:
    582
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    The Spa - Fay Weldon
    Perhaps these words ain't lovely, but I just recalled the phrase "dab hand" and have a general sense that it means to be pretty good at something. Anyone know if this is accurate? Haven't heard this one in many years and I'm mainly wondering what level of expertise it's meant to describe.:)
     
  13. samg

    samg New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2007
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    Lots of books about the battle for Anzio
    That's exactly what it means - my mum uses it all the time.
    One of my favourite words is 'transient.'
    And I love the way Americans say 'squirrel,' which kind of sounds like squirrrrrl but is impossible to say unless you've been brought up to it.
     
  14. bren

    bren Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2006
    Messages:
    582
    Likes Received:
    0
    Currently Reading:
    The Spa - Fay Weldon
    Thanks, samg. Maybe it's another phrase more commom to the UK and that's the big reason I haven't heard it lately. I too enjoy the skwirl, skwi-rel pronunciation split.
     
  15. PhilW

    PhilW New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2006
    Messages:
    159
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well....I'm English, and I always say 'roo-ter' - after all, it routes ('roots') information from one place to another. As the song lyrics say, 'get your kicks on route ('root') 66' - not even the original artist says 'raowt' 66!

    Rout ('raowt') means to displace enemy forces from the battlefield 'en masse', or to cut a profile on a piece of wood. Now that's where the confusion comes in...I can rout ('raowt') a profile, and I use a router ('raowter') to do it, as opposed to the router ('rooter') that my computer network uses...

    Two nations divided by a common language? I think so, yes!
     
  16. PhilW

    PhilW New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2006
    Messages:
    159
    Likes Received:
    0
    I hate to say this, but the 'squirl' thing just sounds like laziness to me - witness many Americans' pronounciation of other, similar words - for example, mirror, terrorism. GB jnr wants to wage war on 'terrism' - sounds to me like he has a vendetta against holidaymakers!

    Ooo...'vendetta' - that's a good one
     
  17. PhilW

    PhilW New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2006
    Messages:
    159
    Likes Received:
    0
    Jewelry - 'jool-ry'
    Jewellery - 'jool-ery'

    Emphasis on first syllable in each case. Both versions are correct and in current usage - at least in the UK! I prefer the latter myself.
     

Share This Page