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Suggestions: November 2004

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Stewart

Active Member
Brida said:
Eleven Minutes by Paulo Coelho :)

How many times do you need to suggest this? Coelho's books seem rather small - I doubt it would take four hours, let alone four months, to read.
 

novella

Active Member
Something by Andre Dubus? House of Sand and Fog or Dancing After Hours, perhaps? There's also In the Bedroom. I haven't read any of these yet, but they're on my list.

Novella
 

Rogue

New Member
what about:

I Am Legend - Richard Matheson
One of the most influential vampire novels of the 20th century, I Am Legend regularly appears on the "10 Best" lists of numerous critical studies of the horror genre. As Richard Matheson's third novel, it was first marketed as science fiction (for although written in 1954, the story takes place in a future 1976). A terrible plague has decimated the world, and those who were unfortunate enough to survive have been transformed into blood-thirsty creatures of the night. Except, that is, for Robert Neville. He alone appears to be immune to this disease, but the grim irony is that now he is the outsider. He is the legendary monster who must be destroyed because he is different from everyone else. Employing a stark, almost documentary style, Richard Matheson was one of the first writers to convince us that the undead can lurk in a local supermarket freezer as well as a remote Gothic castle. His influence on a generation of bestselling authors--including Stephen King and Dean Koontz--who first read him in their youth is, well, legendary. - amazon

The Day of the Triffids - John Wyndham
In 1951 John Wyndham published his novel The Day of the Triffids to moderate acclaim. Fifty-two years later, this horrifying story is a science fiction classic, touted by The Times (London) as having “all the reality of a vividly realized nightmare.”
Bill Masen, bandages over his wounded eyes, misses the most spectacular meteorite shower England has ever seen. Removing his bandages the next morning, he finds masses of sightless people wandering the city. He soon meets Josella, another lucky person who has retained her sight, and together they leave the city, aware that the safe, familiar world they knew a mere twenty-four hours before is gone forever.
But to survive in this post-apocalyptic world, one must survive the Triffids, strange plants that years before began appearing all over the world. The Triffids can grow to over seven feet tall, pull their roots from the ground to walk, and kill a man with one quick lash of their poisonous stingers. With society in shambles, they are now poised to prey on humankind. Wyndham chillingly anticipates bio-warfare and mass destruction, fifty years before their realization, in this prescient account of Cold War paranoia. amazon
 

Rogue

New Member
I've read Prey last year and to be honest it was a bit disappointing. Michael Crichton is certainly a very good writer and I love "The Lost World" and "Sphere" but his last books "Timeline" and "Prey" are missing something.
 

mr_michel

kickbox
how about blindness by jose saramago, i read it when it come out, wouldnt mind to read it again, and i have seen several post where members say its on their -to read- lists
 

novella

Active Member
Process question

Darren or others,

Just a question about how the decision-making is done: Do you take a straight headcount and decide based on which book of those suggested gets the most votes?

If so, the drawback is that I think there are several suggestions that I would concede to, though not vote for, so that I could participate in the discussion. Conversely, there are several book that I would not want to read at all, and therefore would not participate in that discussion at all. The question pertains to whether the goal is to have the most participants in the discussion or whether it is to have a few people read the book they really want to read, and whether the discussion is broad does not matter.

Thanks,

Novella
 

Darren

Active Member
novella said:
Just a question about how the decision-making is done
Once it gets to two months before the month in question, nominations close and a separate vote is taken using the polls feature. The poll closes one month before the book in question to give people chance to order a copy of the book if they want to take part.

So for September, we've got The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas.
 

novella

Active Member
The Three Musketeers

Are you agreeing to read a particular translation? I understand there is quite a bit of difference between, say the Oxford U. Press edition and the Tor edition, and imagine the same is true of other available translations. Also, there is a common abridged version.

Novella
 

Litany

Active Member
I'll be reading the Wordsworth Classics version. It's complete and unabridged, and it only costs £1.50. Wordworth Classics rock.
 

RaVeN

New Member
I have a version published by the International Collectors Library. The problem is, nowhere is it noted if it's the complete or unabridged version. As far as that goes, the publishing date isn't even listed but I think it's at least 20 years old. Whatever the case, that's the one I'll be reading.


RaVeN
 

mr_michel

kickbox
i once read the three musketeers when i was younger but it seemed awfully short, i evet got to think it was a resume for young audiences, but were never sure, so tell me: its the original version shorter than you expected?
 

RaVeN

New Member
The version I have is a hardback, 628 pages in length. It doesn't seem too short to me. :) I hope it's not the abridged one.


RaVeN
 
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