• Welcome to BookAndReader!

    We LOVE books and hope you'll join us in sharing your favorites and experiences along with your love of reading with our community. Registering for our site is free and easy, just CLICK HERE!

    Already a member and forgot your password? Click here.

Ernest Hemingway

saliotthomas

New Member
a nice place,the view on notre dame,and the nice little garden beside,make it one of best lockated booktore i know.
The atmosphere is also very friendly!
Thanks for the news,he still kicking so!
 

Sin

New Member
I have just finished “The Old Man and the Sea”.
It’s my first Hemingway and I am a little bit disappointed.
I know it’s a simple story about a simple man and Ernest used a simple language on purpose. However, I ask myself, what the purpose of such a story is.
Are all his works like this or he has something better to offer?
It seems to me that he had more interesting personal life than his books.
 

Robert

Active Member
I loved that story! Who doesn't like a tragic hero?

There is more to that then a simple story. Hemingway got the Pulitzer for that story, and I understand it was instrumental in his winning the Nobel Prize.

Hemmingway was a wonderful writer, so you may want to give him another try before giving up on him.
 

Sin

New Member
I don't say that it's so bad but I expected something better. I wouldn't have read the whole story if I disliked it completely.
I know he got all kinds of prizes so he must be worth his fame. I might try "For whom the bell tolls". At least the subject matter sounds interesting.
 

Robert

Active Member
I don't say that it's so bad but I expected something better. I wouldn't have read the whole story if I disliked it completely.
I know he got all kinds of prizes so he must be worth his fame. I might try "For whom the bell tolls". At least the subject matter sounds interesting.

I haven't read that one. Please let me know what you think.
 

Sin

New Member
I don't know when will I read it but this is what I found on Wikipedia:

For Whom the Bell Tolls is a novel by Ernest Hemingway published in 1940. It tells the story of Robert Jordan, a young American in the International Brigades attached to an anti-fascist guerilla unit during the Spanish Civil War. As an expert in the use of explosives, he is assigned to blow up a bridge during an attack on the city of Segovia. This novel is widely regarded to be amongst Hemingway's greatest works, along with The Sun Also Rises, The Old Man and the Sea, and A Farewell to Arms.

It certainly sounds interesting but I will see.
What else have you read except The Old Man?
 

sparkchaser

Administrator and Stuntman
Staff member
What Hemingway Would Think of the Internet

Snippet:

We need to power down our tablets and smartphones, men, and get back to challenging Mother Nature to kill us for our ambition and arrogance, whether it’s stalking a hungry lion or climbing Mount Kilimanjaro.

Dominating at Angry Birds or FarmVille is no way to prove our manhood. You can score badges on Foursquare and become the mayor of a local organic vegan cafe, but wouldn’t you rather score bronze and silver medals of valor like Hemingway did in World Wars I and II?

Wouldn’t you rather learn about life from adventure (and mojito-fueled misadventure) than Wikipedia?

Perhaps Hemingway would approve of a select few online destinations:

• He would love Twitter; his greatest quotes are all 140 characters or less.

• Considering his fondness for kitties, Hemingway would spend countless hours on YouTube and I Can Has Cheezburger?

• Like all men, Papa loathed shopping — the only store where he felt comfortable was Abercrombie & Fitch, back when it distributed sporting goods instead of gay porn — so Amazon would make his purchases quick and painless. Unfortunately Amazon does not stock vintage, wormwood-laced absinthe.

Another plus: Reading For Whom the Bell Tolls on a Kindle or Nook won’t give you carpal tunnel like hefting the damn hardcover.

So technology isn’t all bad; it’s just a problem when the easy shortcuts and addictive distractions make us lazy, incompetent and unable to differentiate between “you’re,” “your” and “ur.” Hemingway advised novelists to “write drunk, edit sober,” whereas Facebook is for writing drunk and editing never.
 

SFG75

Well-Known Member
If The Old Man and the Sea was: The Old Man and the Laptop.

"'I hit enter, you must carry out the command computer, or else I will die.' He took a bite out of tuna for strength and sat back as the living room began to fade as the .pdf document pulled him further and further into the kitchen away from the shoreline. Just then, he spilled coffee on his hand, burning himself. "I wish I had the boy here to help me, this is a big download." You do not have the boy here thought the old man, you only have you. 'I wonder if the great Jeter of New York would be proud of me, his father was a fisherman too.'"
:lol::lol:

Thanks for the thoughts sparky, I could see the old man now.:)
 

Threak17

New Member
I've always thought The Old Man and the Sea was about as good as it gets for simple, clean writing. Loved the story, loved the execution.
And, for those of you that haven't had the chance to read it, I would recommend hunting down a copy of WITH HEMINGWAY - A Year in Key West and Cuba by Arnold Samuelson. Samuelson was an aspiring writer who hitchhiked to Key West and met E.H. who offered him a job as a deck hand on his boat, the Pilar and offered to teach him how to write. A true story and a great read...
 

St. Stephen

kickbox
Papa is the man. I've only read The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, The Old Man and the Sea, and some short stories. A Clean Well Lighted Place is fantastic.

I went through a huge Lost Generation phase in high school. Got all into disillusionment so The Sun Also Rises still stands as my favorite. The last three sentences are legendary what with Brett commenting on what a damn good time they could have had, then the policeman halting the car (war getting in the way), and a then matured Jake brushing her off with the "isn't it pretty to think so?"

Has anyone seen Midnight in Paris? The actor for Hemingway was pretty good.

awww.petanim.com_wp_content_uploads_2010_10_hemingway.jpg
 

Hugh

Member
Papa is the man. I've only read The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, The Old Man and the Sea, and some short stories. A Clean Well Lighted Place is fantastic.

I went through a huge Lost Generation phase in high school. Got all into disillusionment so The Sun Also Rises still stands as my favorite. The last three sentences are legendary what with Brett commenting on what a damn good time they could have had, then the policeman halting the car (war getting in the way), and a then matured Jake brushing her off with the "isn't it pretty to think so?"

Has anyone seen Midnight in Paris? The actor for Hemingway was pretty good.

awww.petanim.com_wp_content_uploads_2010_10_hemingway.jpg

Great picture of Papa there! Since he was a friend to cats I wondered if it ever troubled him when he killed big cats on his safari trips to Africa.
 

jestoppel

New Member
Has anyone seen Midnight in Paris? The actor for Hemingway was pretty good.

awww.petanim.com_wp_content_uploads_2010_10_hemingway.jpg

really? i didn't like hemingway in 'midnight' at all. seemed arrogant and misguided,
in a silly, peevish way rather than some hot-blooded genius way, which is what i think they were trying to get at.
 

aReader

New Member
I've read 'A Farewell to arms,The old man and the sea, For whom the bell tolls ....only . 'A Farewell to arms' was quite good.
 

A2R.

Member
I've been haunted by this man for over a year now. His name follows me and provokes me to read his writings but his character irritates me. The manly-man. Enemy to Joyce and all those with the sliver of feministic qualities. I've yet to read his works and I've yet to establish him a genius.
 

nickherc

Member
He sure was a character. He had a strong personality. I don't like all his work, but his writing style is awesome, just as I like it. A farewell to arms is my favorite Hemingway book.
 

753C

Active Member
Ha, I didn't like Farewell to Arms that much the first time I read it, but, I re-read it later and really ended up liking it. It changed my perception of Hemingway, who I always thought was heavily overrated. Since then I read several more if his, including For Whom the Bell Tolls, and The Old Man and The Sea, and I liked those as well.
 
Top