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Zhizara

Member
I finally was able to read The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet's Nest. I really enjoyed it except for one part near the beginning where he goes into tedious detail about cold war history. I just skimmed over those pages.
 

shadforth

Member
Sacred Hunger by Barry Unsworth :star4: Won the 1992 Booker Prize. Story of a slave ship in 1752 sailing from Liverpool for Africa. Explores greed amongst other traits of human nature. Very good read.
 

canuck

Active Member
I finally was able to read The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet's Nest. I really enjoyed it except for one part near the beginning where he goes into tedious detail about cold war history. I just skimmed over those pages.

Hello Zhizara: I was interested in reading your post - I haven't read the two previous books which I'm told are part of a trilogy. I bought The Girl Who.....from Amazon and people keep telling me that I should read the other two books first. Is this going to be necessary for me to understand the third book? I bought this book as Amazon was offering a bunch of the newer books at half price. It looks like quite a long book and I don't really want to plow through two others to get to this if I don't have to. :blink:
 

beer good

Well-Known Member
Christian Kracht, Ich werde hier sein im Sonnenschein und im Schatten. Odd novel. Not sure what to make of it. Full of ideas and concepts, some of which outstay their welcome and others are just breezed past, all delivered in a beautiful but needlessly convoluted prose... There's a great 350-page novel in here. It's 141. It's not a bad 141, but if he'd either tackled a little less or given it more room, it might have been great. :star3:
 

Cenere

kickbox
Last week I finished reading Eldest by Christopher Paolini. It is the sequel to the popular book, Eragon. I have already read the book before, but I'm rereading the series once or twice before the last installment, Inheritance, is released in three weeks. Seeing as I have not read the Inheritance cycle in about two years, I figured I would catch up and refresh my memory with the books.
:star5:
 
The Talented Mr. Ripley

It was pretty decent, I don't think I'll read any of the sequels though. I was hoping it would be a evil type character that I would like, like Hannibal Lector, Dexter, etc., but I just thought Tom Ripley was a weirdo pretty much the entire book, and I didn't think he was especially smart and crafty, just weird and lucky.
 

canuck

Active Member
The Talented Mr. Ripley

It was pretty decent, I don't think I'll read any of the sequels though. I was hoping it would be a evil type character that I would like, like Hannibal Lector, Dexter, etc., but I just thought Tom Ripley was a weirdo pretty much the entire book, and I didn't think he was especially smart and crafty, just weird and lucky.

Tell me what it is you like about an evil type character, eg. Hannibal Lecter.:blink:
 

Fantasy Moon

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Last week I finished reading Eldest by Christopher Paolini. It is the sequel to the popular book, Eragon. I have already read the book before, but I'm rereading the series once or twice before the last installment, Inheritance, is released in three weeks. Seeing as I have not read the Inheritance cycle in about two years, I figured I would catch up and refresh my memory with the books.
:star5:
Too much boring story with Roran and so not enough Murtagh for my tastes.
 

anu

Member
'Life is what you make it' by Preeti Shenoy. It is a story of a schizophrenic girl, who all of a sudden loses her ability to comprehend and turns suicidal. The novel traces her fall into the dungeons of depression and her struggle to come out of it. A touching book, especially as Preeti Shenoy beautifully describes the thought process of Ankita the protagonist, as if she is herself feeling it. Though, the book was too casual in the beginning, but after 100 pages or so, it got quite emotional and thought provoking.
 
Tell me what it is you like about an evil type character, eg. Hannibal Lecter.:blink:


He is a genius, mainly kills rude/asshole people, and says things that can make you think.

Dexter (the popular tv show based off the books) is a genius, says things that make you think, and kills murderers.

:whistling:
 

SFG75

Well-Known Member
The Help by Kathryn Stockett-It is now a major motion picture, I guess that I wanted to read the book first. It was a good back and had it had its good moments of humor mixed between heart tugging emotion. The introduction of Abilene, Skeeter, and Minny could have been handled better, it just seemed too jumbled together at first for my liking. Other than that, it is worth the money.

:star2:
 

Cenere

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Too much boring story with Roran and so not enough Murtagh for my tastes.

I particularly enjoy reading about Roran. He is a very determined and head-strong character. I admittedly anticipate Roran retaining a very significant role in Inheritance, more so than even in the other books. It is also relieving to have intervals of hiatus whilst reading Eldest and Brisingr, so the story does not seem so monotonous in only Eragon's perspective.
On the other hand, I cannot wait to see how Murtagh's future will play out throughout the last sequel.
 

mmyap

Member
I read The Woman In Black by Susan Hill on Saturday. Literally read it straight through in one sitting. I highly recommend it, especially one week before Halloween. Beautifully atmospheric and dark and broody. The haunted, desolate house theme developed perfectly for your spine chilling pleasure.
 

Cenere

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Sunday night I finished reading Twilight. I believe it was the fourth time I have read it. Despite the unrelenting controversy over the Twilight Saga, I enjoy it with each read.
 

Disenthral

Member
I just finished George R.R. Martins - A Dance With Dragons :star3:

It didn't suck....But I want to say it did since I loved the first 3 so much and it was so....blehhh in comparison.But I guess I shouldn't have expected much after A Feast Of Crows..
 

shadforth

Member
I read The Woman In Black by Susan Hill on Saturday. Literally read it straight through in one sitting. I highly recommend it, especially one week before Halloween. Beautifully atmospheric and dark and broody. The haunted, desolate house theme developed perfectly for your spine chilling pleasure.

That's probably my favourite ghost story.

The Law Of Dreams by Peter Behrens :star4: The story of how one man suffers and tries to survive the Irish potato famine.
 

beer good

Well-Known Member
Haruki Murakami, 1Q84.

And, well, the third volume is pretty much more of the same. Can't say I'm all that impressed with it. I may be missing something really obvious, but... :star3:, and not a strong three.
 

Cenere

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Only a few minutes ago I finished reading Dear John by Nicholas Sparks. Despite having read this book three times, I still bawled like a baby. The book is incomparable to the movie, but I think I would still watch it if it were not for my art homework that I am procrastinating. At any rate, I enjoyed yet another read of Dear John; this weekend I think I will pick up some more books Sparks has to offer. He is a fantastic writer.
:star5:
 

canuck

Active Member
Only a few minutes ago I finished reading Dear John by Nicholas Sparks. Despite having read this book three times, I still bawled like a baby. The book is incomparable to the movie, but I think I would still watch it if it were not for my art homework that I am procrastinating. At any rate, I enjoyed yet another read of Dear John; this weekend I think I will pick up some more books Sparks has to offer. He is a fantastic writer.
:star5:

Hi Cenere: I read the review of this book and it seems like a book to be sad about, I guess you found it that way. Do you like tragic books more than other kinds of books. I'm always interested in the choices other readers make. :)
 

Cenere

kickbox
Hi Cenere: I read the review of this book and it seems like a book to be sad about, I guess you found it that way. Do you like tragic books more than other kinds of books. I'm always interested in the choices other readers make. :)

Ultimately, I enjoy a good read. When it comes to romance, I am analogous to books that make me cry--I am conceived aware of how inspiring the book really is for me. Though I cannot personally impart with Dear John itself, I can competently feel at ease with the characters' thoughts, emotions, and memories.
I suppose I can admit that I do enjoy a tragic ending. I am reading Romeo and Juliet right now and I already thoroughly apprehend that the story results in tragic distress. Call me a masochist if you will, but I love a calamitous cessation.
 
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