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Which book set you off on a life of crime (reading)?

Discussion in 'Crime Fiction, Thrillers, & Mysteries' started by Nellie, Jul 18, 2009.

  1. Nellie

    Nellie New Member

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    I was ambling around by bookshelves and found my copy of A Summer In The South By James Marshall.

    It's a children's whodunnit, and has the traditional detective and sidekick along with a cast of dodgy characters, any of whom could be up to no good for a variety of reasons. I adored this book, and can remember seeking out all sorts of mysteries after reading this.

    So, which book led you to a life of crime reading?
     
  2. saliotthomas

    saliotthomas New Member

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    I used to read few thrillers but without method,just as a nice break.
    Then i read The Hunter by Richard Stark and could not stop.I paced myshelf and i'm unfortunatly near the end of the serie the 17th.Comeback.(I shall re-read the best of them when finished,The outfit,slayground,the mourner...)
    I read also read nearly all Dortmunders by Westlake and currently the last Get real.
     
  3. Comeflyaway

    Comeflyaway Member

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    Currently Reading:
    "The Good Lawyer" by Thomas Benigno
    When I was in 9th grade, my English teacher required outside "pleasure reading." Bookworm that I am, I started plowing through the Sue Grafton alphabet series ("A is for Alibi," "B is for Burglar," etc.). I went through them 2-3 a week until my teacher FORBADE me to read them anymore. She said that they were too easy for me and that I should read something more challenging instead. I was pissed, considering that everyone else was permitted to get away with 1-2 "young adult" books a month, so I disobeyed and continued to read them on the sly ;-)
     
  4. Nellie

    Nellie New Member

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    How rude of her!

    There is a whole new thread there isn't there...? The "How did you read on the sly as child" thread!
     
  5. Miss Chicken

    Miss Chicken New Member

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    Currently Reading:
    Through a Glass, Deadly - Sarah Atwell
    I am not sure what book lead me into reading crime novels but in probably a novel by Agatha Christie. My mother was an avid reading of many genres including crime fiction and I started reading many of Mum's books when I was a teenager (more than 30 years ago).
     
  6. Nellie

    Nellie New Member

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    I read Agatha Christie when I was young too, and it became rather an obsession for me. I think it is the total Englishness of it all. I grew up in a small English village, much like St Mary Mead, although there were far few deaths!
     
  7. Ummm

    Ummm New Member

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    I moved to Australia as a teenager. English is not my first language. A friend introduced me to Christopher Pike's books and I'd be hooked my murder/mystery/thrillers since. His books really got me interested in reading English books (which were a struggle previously.)
     
  8. Contrarytwo

    Contrarytwo New Member

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    Early crime reading

    This started in the later 1950's and onward. Having and older sister I started reading her Nancy Drew and Cherry Ames books while in elementary school and then the library opened up to me the Hardy Boys and Tom Swift books. There was another series of books I read which I cannot remember the name of, but the hero was a photographer and science guy who used his wits in his crime solving. I cannot remember his sidekick. From then on I would read whatever was in the house my mom had, what appeared interesting in the library card catalog. And I still enjoy crime stuff.
    I'm an old guy now and have always enjoyed reading.
     
  9. whit3tig3y

    whit3tig3y New Member

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    Currently Reading:
    The John Wyndham Omnibus by John Wyndham
    I bought "The Killing Hour" by Lisa Gardner back when I was about 16 when my power went out at home for a week and had nothing better to do than to read.

    LOVED that book, and started reading all her other books. And then moved onto other crime books :)
     
  10. mmyap

    mmyap Member

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    I remember getting a hold of an Agatha Christie. Once I read one I plundered the local library until I had read all that they had.

    I also remember reading a book called "Down A Dark Hall" that I really enjoyed. I just loved it. It had a nice creep factor. I looked it up on Amazon and it's still available! I was amazed. The fact that I remember this book all this time later amazes me. I may order it and revisit my youth. For anyone else interested the author is Lois Duncan.
     
  11. cajunmama

    cajunmama Active Member

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    Encyclopedia Brown in, oh, about the third grade (some 25 yrs ago...)
     
  12. Peder

    Peder Well-Known Member

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    Arrowsmiith by Sinclair Lewis, as a required reading in High School.
    I wasn't much of a reader before then, but when I finished it over a weekend and realized I could read a "grown up" book (i.e. one without pictures), and with a real story, I was hooked forever. Started reading everything in sight and haven't stopped since. Next one was The Wings of the Morning, a romance from my mother's bookshelf. And then Sherlock Holmes.
     
  13. Heteronym

    Heteronym New Member

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    I wish I could give an original answer, but for me were the usual classic suspects: Poe's stories of ruthless criminals and logical puzzles, Doyle's Sherlock Holmes, Agatha Christie's fast-paced mysteries.
     
  14. velocipede2288

    velocipede2288 New Member

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    Currently Reading:
    Reginald Hill/Dalziel and Pasco novel
    I remember reading an Inspector Maigret novel sent to me by a book club about 50 years ago, since then I have collected and read many Simenon novels as well as lots of other crime authors. Ed McBain being my facourite with his 87th precinct novels.
     
  15. K M Britt

    K M Britt New Member

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    I remember reading Nancy Drew when I was five or six years old.
     
  16. MimiLuvsMystery

    MimiLuvsMystery New Member

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    I wish I could remember but I'm an old babe and there's no way I could ever pinpoint my first mystery!

    As a kid, my mother and I would fight over who first got to read the true crime story in the New York Daily News so my lust for mystery probably started then.

    I can probably safely say that one of the early mystery novelists I read was Agatha Christie. I only guessed the villian once in all of her books and only guessed that one by all the wrong deductions on my part ... Christie just never gave enough clues ... that's my story and I'm sticking to it!! (LOL)
     
  17. Lincoln Rhyme

    Lincoln Rhyme New Member

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    Mine started with Jack & Jill by James Patterson. Although now that I look back on it,it was a bad book,but it was pretty unique at the time I read it. You see I was 13 at the time,and was heavy into the fantasy genre,then I was leafing through by dad's books and found Jack & Jill. I got a couple pages into it,and was pretty freaked out at what was inside. It was weird that my first mystery novel was a adult novel. But now I hardly read anything but mystery thanks to James Patterson's Alex Cross character :lol:. I've even caught up to the latest Alex Cross book.
     
  18. The Butcher

    The Butcher New Member

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    Currently Reading:
    The Closers by Micheal Connelly
    James Patterson's 1st To Die.I read some of the Cross series,though it did not motivate me enough to read more of Mystery.Then my brother convinced my mom to buy 1st To Die,which led me to the adventures of The Woman's Murder Club.He did not like it so he let me have it.At the time I had a blast with the series.But,now I hate the series,and moved on to better Mysteries like Harry Bosch,and Sean Dillion.
     
  19. PlaypitsPark

    PlaypitsPark Member

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    In terms of authors, it has to be Ian Rankin. I was once a policeman, and hated crime novels because they were so false. Then I read one of Rankin's early Rebus novels (Knots and Crosses, maybe? Not sure). I got hooked on them, and I read all of his work. It was realistic, in line with my own experiences in the police. I also love Kathy Reichs' stuff, and Michael Connelly.
     
  20. Lincoln Rhyme

    Lincoln Rhyme New Member

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    Connelly is okay. Although I've only read 3 books from him. One of them I didn't like,but the other two were decent.
     

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